The First 100 Days: Observations of a Nouveau Blogger

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I’ve been a blogger for a whopping 100 days, and it’s been a delightful and educational experience. Some readers (Omer Trajman, in particular) asked me share my observations about my blogging experience, so here goes:

1. The more popular a person thinks he is in the blogosphere, the thinner his skin and the thicker his hypocrisy. This should be exactly the opposite: the higher you go the thicker the skin and thinner the hypocrisy.

2. The more a blogger uses the pronoun “I,” the less he has to say. Many bloggers apparently believe that people not only give a shiitake about everything they say, but that these people are hanging on to every word.

3. There are three kinds of bloggers: human newsbots (is this an oxymoron?), ranters, and essayists. Each kind is an art form. The third category, the essayists, might be the most difficult kind of blogging, and unfortunately, the category I aspire to. It’s a good thing I have eight books to plagiarize. (Two “I”s in one paragraph!)

4. Not to be sexist, but some men make the blog, and some blogs make the man.

5. An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogger who experts.

6. Blogging technology is a piece of cake. TypePad powers my blog, and this product is very well done. Plus, almost all the things that one would want a blog to do are (a) available and (b) free–or very cheap. For example, Ecto, Endo, FeedBlitz, StatCounter, BlogFlux, NetNewsWire, Feedburner, and FreeFind. The only two things that I can’t find are:

  • An automatically-generated table of contents. “Recent posts” only puts up the last ten posts. I need something that will go back to the very beginning.
  • I want to do a “Dear Abby” column in which people post questions, and I answer. These can’t be comments tied to a specific post because they would get buried. I’d like to create an archive of questions and answers that people can search. I looked at a couple of Wiki products, but I didn’t have the mental energy to adapt them to my needs.

7. The vast majority of people who read my blog are kind, helpful, and intelligent. One, Thomas Kang, voluntarily proofreads for me. Sometimes readers will even write software for you: for example, three people offered to create a page counter that resets itself daily since I couldn’t find one. (This is what you see as Kuba Choinski’s “KubaKounter” on my blog.) A big cheese at TypePad also wrote a Widget for me that cause links to automatically open new pages.

How cool is this?! With this whole Widget thing in TypePad, maybe someone will create Widgets that create a table of contents and a “Dear Abby” column.

8. A tiny amount of people who read my blog are clueless. My favorites are the ones who complain about four things: the top-ten format; the bulleted-list format; the long length of my posts; and my plugs for stuff that I like. This is akin to going into a sushi bar and complaining that it serves raw fish. That’s what a sushi bar does. Long top tens, bulleted lists, essays, and evangelism are what I do.

I especially love the people who threaten to stop reading my blog unless I stop doing one of those four things. Let me get this straight: You’re going to stop reading my free blog? I hope they have a SCUBA (Self Contained Underwater Bozo Apparatus) tank because they won’t be able to hold their breath long enough.

9. I love this Technorati ranking thing. I know it probably doesn’t mean much, but it’s fun. I’ll never play in the NHL, and I’ll never start a billion-dollar company, but I could get into the Technorati top ten. Everybody has to have goals, and this is one of mine…

9 a. I don’t get this “exchanging links” thing. IMHO, you should link to a blog if you believe it’s good for your readership. The other blogger should link to back your blog if she believes it’s good for her readership. In a perfect world, linking is about quality, not reciprocation, with all due respect to Dr. Cialdini. 🙂

10. It’s hard to make money blogging. The advertising revenues don’t add up to much, but there are other significant rewards like helping people change the world..

Finally, a little story for you: At 11:00 pm a few weeks ago, my wife asked me, “What are you doing?” I wish I could have said, “Making money.” Instead I told her, “I’m changing the world, 15,000 people at a time.” To which she deadpanned, “Oh, you’re blogging again…”

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By | 2016-10-24T14:27:49+00:00 April 11th, 2006|Categories: Blogging|Tags: |122 Comments

About the Author:

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. Formerly, he was an advisor to the Motorola business unit of Google and chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of Social Media, The Art of the Start, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

122 Comments

  1. Mario Bucolo April 11, 2006 at 9:27 am

    changing the world…a big works…I think that blogs are changing the net-world and few of them are really have the mission to change the world.
    I operate in a very traditional sector like museums where blogs are very few…but thanks to a group of people we still try to open eyes to this “old sector”. Now many museums blogs appear on the net, the problem was to find the right visibility, as a things to do this I create a museum blogs webring, hoping that more visibility will help to open minds in this sector.

  2. Smittie April 11, 2006 at 10:26 am

    OK, so, with regard to number 7. I want to point out that you get a lot more help and attention than most people. People are a lot more kind and helpful when they are helping famous people. This probably is not the way the world should work and this is by no fault of yours. However, it is a fact of life. People do things for you because you’re Guy Kawasaki.

  3. Matthew Wilder April 11, 2006 at 10:39 am

    Regarding item 9:
    Now that you are on the top 100, you have your beachhead. I feel that if you continue building upon your focus on entrepreneurship you will grow your audience to the point that you can reach the top 10. For instance, you are moving toward intrapreneurship and even more general advice that applies to any business person (customer orientation, great products, etc), and even more so, personal experience and direction, such as your post on your mea culpa. This type of generalisation will do well for you.

  4. Guy Kawasaki April 11, 2006 at 10:45 am

    Smittie,
    While I don’t deny that I get special treatment when people know “who I am,” I am a big believer in “sucking down” per my blog entry.
    Anybody can get special treatment when they’re famous. The challenge is to get special treatment when they are simply nice.
    I don’t believe that one has to be famous for people to receive help. Many people provide assistance because it’s either their job or for the pure pleasure of doing so.
    Guy

  5. james April 11, 2006 at 10:56 am

    Well said, Guy.
    Smittie, Guy probably gets some help because he’s famous, but remember that he’s famous because he’s a good communicator. My experience is that bloggers are by and large a very helpful crew who are eager to offer advice, widgets and code snippets (even to those of us who aren’t well known).

  6. Mike Landman April 11, 2006 at 11:09 am

    You know Guy, if there is one thing I cannot stand, it’s someone who observes and then shares valuable insight. WHO do you think you are? FORCING me to read your blog!?! If I can ever figure out how to stop reading, well… I will. I’ll stop reading. I’ll do it…

  7. Doug Hanna April 11, 2006 at 11:11 am

    You’re blog is a great read. 🙂 I’m sure your blog has helped your book sales, so that’s some financial gain from your blog.

  8. K April 11, 2006 at 11:15 am

    I don’t blog for the money either.
    Don’t even bother with the ads.
    Strictly volunteer work.
    Trying to stop bad marketing from happening.
    And yes, I’ve had readers threaten to stop reading if I didn’t change this or that.
    Funny thing is that I never knew he or she was reading in the first place (I don’t keep track of stats and unless the person posts…)
    I enjoy your blog, and yes, I need to set aside a little bit of time to read it, but it’s worth it!

  9. Baysharam Babu April 11, 2006 at 11:23 am

    I like you blog alot, but I get disturbed when I read long post only. Some nice joke would be nice. You musta be funny man

  10. Todd April 11, 2006 at 11:25 am

    …don’t forget that your first 100 days of blogging included that hilarious “bozo-ism” thread.
    That was extremely entertaining, original content that spread across the net.
    Congrats on your first 100
    T

  11. Rick Dobbs April 11, 2006 at 11:26 am

    That last tag line sounds a lot like mine on my blog. Want to exchange links? 😉

  12. Cool Blogs April 11, 2006 at 11:56 am

    Interesting?

    Short one today; Guy Kawasaki wrote on his blog about his experiences in his first 100 days of blogging.
    One comment summed up my thoughts on Cool Blogs:
    5. An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogger who experts.
    I hope you find Cool Blog…

  13. Brad Hutchings April 11, 2006 at 11:57 am

    Guy, If you want the ultimate in flexible blogging, I would suggest getting Expression Engine (pmachine.com) and a part time geek (10 hours a week) to write templates for you. On the surface, it’s a blogging system, but you can do tons more with it. I’d be happy to send you a sample off-list, or you can wait a couple weeks and see the finished product!

  14. dg April 11, 2006 at 12:14 pm

    Reading this, I remembered that you announced the blog on your mailing list. Then I realized I can’t recall getting anything from your mailing list in awhile. Did I miss a bunch, or are you relying more on the blog than mailings? If so, is this by design?

  15. HC April 11, 2006 at 12:15 pm

    Guy, your blog is a pleasure to read. Keep up the great work!

  16. paresh April 11, 2006 at 12:36 pm

    “With this whole Widget thing in TypePad, maybe someone will create Widgets that create a table of contents and a “Dear Abby” column.”
    Thats a nice way to put a RFC (Request for code). Please continue writing and surely we readers will take you to your goal.

  17. Stacy Jo McDermott April 11, 2006 at 12:39 pm

    Guy, you already know how much I love your blog, insights and info that you share with us. I’m happy that you find the experience delightful, as it really comes through in what you write.
    It’s interesting to note that back in the centuries before, personal journal keeping was as prevelent as blogging is becoming today. I wonder what the blogs of the likes of Byron, Shelly, MLK Jr, Einstien, ect. would contain for all the world to see. What links would they include? An interesting thought exercise.
    Keep it up Guy…you do make the world a better place.

  18. ANA Marketing Maestros April 11, 2006 at 12:56 pm

    ANA Notes and News

    A quick laundry list of things going on in and around the ANA: Just got back from ANA Training, and was pleasantly surprised to be instructed by the former brand guru at GE who reported directly to Jack Welch. Need

  19. C. Enrique Ortiz April 11, 2006 at 1:09 pm

    Awesome Guy… Congrats on the Technorati top list, and your 1st 100 days, and sharing your observations.
    I like your classification of bloggers – right on the money 🙂
    Writing good content is not easy. I too (try to) aspire to be an essayist, but also is the hardest – it takes so long to write – which is why I don’t post as often as I would like to. My posts are about informing (pass along important information, with added personal comments), and teaching others (via technical content), and opinions about the state of things (thus it is about helping others) about wireless mobility technologies.
    If making money was the goal for blogging, I wouldn’t be blogging at all – writing good content is very time consuming. But I try to make enough money to pay for the website’s operating expenses, which is why I have some ads – and that goal I meet – it works out OK.
    About ranting, that should be the exception – I try not to rant, except when I have no choice (like my recent Mobile Monday Austin-Blogger.com experience since Blogger.com has been slow responding to my emails).
    I am guilty of using “I”, but using “I” when blogging is different than when writing articles or books. Blogs are more about “you” or “I”, about what we have to say about a topic – that is why I subscribe to *certain individual’s* blogs, such as yours, becuase it is about what “you”, or “he” or “she” have to say – so it is OK if you say “I” a lot, I don’t care. But from the “writing” perspective, you are right and such usage should be minimized. That said, I do have a new definition for Blogger for your site:
    Blogger. n. A self-opinionated individual who writes about a particular topic for other self-opinionated individuals…
    Congrats again…
    ceo

  20. Arnie McKinnis April 11, 2006 at 4:13 pm

    I believe there is one more type of blogger – the exhibitionist – they have not opinion, they aren’t providing a commentary and in most cases, they really are very vocal – they are just providing a “glimpse” into their world. This is most often observed in the photo blog arena – but is also on “text” blogs. They basically are saying “hey, I did this today”.

  21. Steve Foster April 11, 2006 at 4:21 pm

    Now I have a complex about the overuse of “I.” How do “I” describe earning my pilot’s license, blogging each lesson in painful detail, without using “I.”

  22. Nicolas April 11, 2006 at 4:53 pm

    Really an interesting read. There is a bias in your first 100 days: you are in a way a celebrity. Your blog have a much higher chance of going high visibility.
    I will tell you after my first 100 days :p

  23. Anshul April 11, 2006 at 4:55 pm

    Guy, I have been reading your blog for quite sometime now. Since, I am a student some of the articles really interest me. Also, you should know this. Most of my profs also read your blog. There is a course in my uni called Entreprenuership. Some of the items they point out are from your blog. And yes, point no 5 is absolutely correct.

  24. Jeff April 11, 2006 at 5:08 pm

    This blog was for me the door to the human side of business. Guy, you definitely change my world!

  25. act2 April 11, 2006 at 5:36 pm

    Talling about The First 100

    Talling about The First 100 Days: Observations of a Nouveau Blogger

  26. Jeff Barson, Nimble April 11, 2006 at 5:45 pm

    I’ll throw in a plug for squarespace.com. I use it for my three blogs:
    http://www.medicalspasonline.com
    http://www.nimbleit.squarespace.com
    http://www.fightclub.squarespace.com
    It’s a paid service but gives you all the widgets built in for a fair price. I have it configured (very easy) to display all my posts from a link in my nav.
    Jeff Barson

  27. Robert Scoble April 11, 2006 at 6:04 pm

    I’m scared now to use the word “I” but I’ll do it anyway: I love your blog. Even if you don’t link out.
    Keep it up. It’s inspiring. I’m glad it came on a week when I’m taking a blog vacation cause I’m gonna think about it more now than if I just linked over and said “nice post.”
    You’re right on, though. Even if it hurts. I’ve become way too thin skinned lately and forgot why I’m blogging.
    Truth is, blogging SHOULD be how you share your love of something with the world. All too often it’s become a business model, or a way to beat up someone else, or a way to play some sort of search engine game.
    I’m guilty of all the above and I’m not gonna do it anymore.
    I might even do a bulletted list format when I come back off of vacation! 🙂

  28. FlightTestArchitect April 11, 2006 at 7:01 pm

    Congrats on your success. (the letter after H) enjoy your blog and books. So, when’s the next one coming out. Also, if you are in LA and have time to spare, drop me a line and I’ll give you a tour of Edwards AFB (where we [mantra]Kick Butt in Air and Space.[/mantra]). I wish we could afford to get you out here to speak to our senior leaders. Take care and I look forward to your continued success! _Scott

  29. Stephen Labuda April 11, 2006 at 7:12 pm

    I can set up the table of contents thing for you. It should only take me a few minutes and I am happy to help.
    S.

  30. Don Larson April 11, 2006 at 7:16 pm

    I have no problem using “I”. There is nothing wrong about addressing ourselves in the first-person.
    The rest of the words in the content will be accepted or rejected on their own merits.
    Don

  31. John Furrier April 11, 2006 at 8:24 pm

    A year ago at your Art of the Start PodTech did its first public podcast. Thanks.
    Your post here was very good. Very inspirational.

  32. Phil Gerbyshak Challenges You to Make It Great! April 11, 2006 at 9:02 pm

    Guy Kawasaki Blogs: 100 Day Review

    Today marks Guy Kawasaki’s 100th day as a blogger, so in typical Guy fashion, he created a top 10 list titled The First 100 Days: Observations of a Nouveau Blogger. Great article, with the most interesting being #8:8. A tiny amount of people who read m…

  33. Brent Edwards April 11, 2006 at 9:15 pm

    Try explaining to your wife why you spend your evenings blogging when your audience is in the tens and not thousands 🙂

  34. Rushi's Ramblings April 11, 2006 at 9:38 pm

    Blogging Observations

    I havent been blogging for that long (started in February). I used to blog a bit now and then but never did it much. WordPress got me involved
    Guy Kawasaki recently completed 100 days of blogging and continuing in this blogging tradition&#3…

  35. Chubby Cherub April 11, 2006 at 9:40 pm

    re #6, “Dear Abby”… I was looking for the same thing for Movable Type for my own site that takes user story submissions. In the end it took just as much time searching for a solution as it was to create a simple application and plugin that did the job.

  36. George Polchin April 11, 2006 at 10:23 pm

    Proofreader check: I think you spelled “shiitake” wrong on April 11, 2006. At least according to the two references I looked at, you did.
    George

  37. the daily FISK! April 11, 2006 at 10:36 pm

    Ten Observations of a Rookie Blogger

    Whilst perusing Dave Winer’s blog I accidentaly came across Guy Kawasaki’s ten observations that he’s learned in his first 100 days of blogging. The ones that I find the most revealing are:

  38. JD on EP April 11, 2006 at 10:52 pm

    Kawasaki’s learnings

    Kawasaki’s learnings: Guy Kawasaki, ex-evangelist for Apple, tells things he learned during his first hundred days of blogging. Some of this stuff is funny to hear someone say (“The more popular a person thinks he is in the blogosphere, the thinner his…

  39. olivier April 11, 2006 at 11:33 pm

    What did we use to do with our free time before this blogging thing anyway?
    Congrats on making your first 100 fly by so fast, Guy.

  40. Guy Kawasaki April 11, 2006 at 11:34 pm

    re: Try explaining to your wife why you spend your evenings blogging when your audience is in the tens and not thousands 🙂
    Now that is funny!
    Guy

  41. Guy Kawasaki April 11, 2006 at 11:36 pm

    re: Proofreader check: I think you spelled “shiitake” wrong on April 11, 2006. At least according to the two references I looked at, you did.
    You know, I looked it up recently. I thought it was spelled with one i, but I’ll change it.
    Thanks,
    Guy

  42. Guy Kawasaki April 11, 2006 at 11:37 pm

    re: I can set up the table of contents thing for you. It should only take me a few minutes and I am happy to help.
    Stephen,
    That would be great. Just let me know!
    Thanks,
    Guy

  43. Ben Rowe's Blog April 12, 2006 at 12:03 am

    The first 100 days

    Guy Kawasaki has been blogging for 100 days, about half as long as I have been. Ive got the strange feeling that he has more readers and more traffic than I do.
    Today he has written a great post about his first 100 days as a blogger.

  44. Kathie M Thomas April 12, 2006 at 12:34 am

    Gee, I haven’t counted how many days I’ve been blogging but can admit to being bitten by the bug too. Hear, hear! on so many things you said. I’d like to make the top 100 too – women bloggers that is! At least here in Australia and I think that’s achievable. I’m just exploring Technorati recently but learning fast. And I believe in changing the world too – by one blog post at a time!

  45. Kathie M Thomas April 12, 2006 at 12:47 am

    Gee, I haven’t counted how many days I’ve been blogging but can admit to being bitten by the bug too. Hear, hear! on so many things you said. I’d like to make the top 100 too – women bloggers that is! At least here in Australia and I think that’s achievable. I’m just exploring Technorati recently but learning fast. And I believe in changing the world too – by one blog post at a time!

  46. The.RSS.Reporter April 12, 2006 at 2:15 am

    =?utf-8?B?ZGVsLmljaW8udXMvcG9wdWxhcg==?=

    Windows Live Academic Home Page

  47. Cecil April 12, 2006 at 2:48 am

    Guy wrote : “I want to do a “Dear Abby” column …”
    ============================
    Hi Guy,
    Have you considered setting up a yahoogroups.com for this purpose ? Check out http://americanturk.blogspot.com/ to see how he has done it.
    Take care ….

  48. Marko April 12, 2006 at 3:25 am

    Guy Congrats,
    What would be an interesting post is “the art of swooping up over 15 thousand devoted blog readers in 100 days.” 😉 Or, how to build and capture an audience.

  49. Mark Evans April 12, 2006 at 5:00 am

    More Love for Canadian Start-Ups

    There is little high-tech venture capital in Canada. Sure, there are venture capital firms but they mostly act like merchant banks – cautiously and conservatively investing in companies with customers, revenue and a track record. When it comes to s…

  50. Matthew Lang April 12, 2006 at 5:43 am

    I find it hilarious that people are actually threatening to stop reading your blog! If people don’t like what someone’s blog is about then don’t read it.
    I aspire to be an essayist blogger but I can’t say that I am much of an expert on any one field. Oh well!

  51. free advertising April 12, 2006 at 6:29 am

    I never knew there are three types of bloggers.
    I wonder where I belong.

  52. JC April 12, 2006 at 7:54 am

    Why not just build your own blog software from the ground up?
    Blogging software, particularly when it is geared to an individual, is not that hard to code.
    It goes into the database as title, body text, maybe a picture or two and perhaps a sig. Nothing too fancy. If you want to go further with formatting, you just use (forgive me, for I am about to sin) an Ajax-like app such as Blogger uses.
    Other than securing the database (and there is a vicious argument against using broadly available software for security reasons alone) the task is simple. And security is an on-going operation anyhow.
    I don’t see the necessity in using something like Typepad when I’m pretty sure that somewhere in the pile of people you deal with there has to be one kid who could churn a piece of blog software out in a day.

  53. Alex Krupp April 12, 2006 at 8:53 am

    Happy anniversary Guy!
    My only comment is that, if you haven’t already, you should try NewsFire for an RSS reader. I used to use NetNewsWire, but I like NewsFire much better now. The only caveat is that you have to stick with it a couple days to see how the animated sorting works, because that is where the added value comes in.

  54. Rotten Grape Juice April 12, 2006 at 9:21 am

    The Grotto Manifesto – Privileged Responsibility

    Are we the privileged or are they?What are the current statistics on the population living on less that US$2 a day? What did you have for lunch and how much did you pay for that lovely suit? I was

  55. :- BlogWize -: April 12, 2006 at 9:32 am

    Guys First 100 Days.

    Guy has shared his observations of his first 100 days as a blogger. Very insightful, and some are downright funny.
    Way to go Guy, rearrange their ignorance 15,000 readers at a time errr.change the world15000 readers …

  56. Jeff April 12, 2006 at 9:40 am

    Had to laugh at number 8 concerning the ‘threats’ to unsubscribe to something free. I have done a podcast for a year and have had a few similar ‘threats’. I think we all certainly love great feedback – good and bad. But I agree that I always had to have a laugh over the ‘threat’ of unsubscribing to something that I offered for free sans-ads!
    Great blog – enjoy it always and often refer particular posts to friends.

  57. Adee April 12, 2006 at 10:03 am

    Guy –
    Bullet # 3 reminds me of the story the Rev. Billy C. Wirtz tells about his grandfather: “There are but three kinds of people in this world, those who can count and those that can’t.” Mazel tov on your Centenniblog!

  58. Scott Young April 12, 2006 at 12:15 pm

    Great thoughts.

  59. kim April 12, 2006 at 12:17 pm

    Great List! I *loved* number 1 and 2. Amen!
    Comments:
    On #9: This seems to be a cultural ‘offspring’ of the MySpace crowd. I get a some readers of my blog, usually younger, that have that approach.
    On #10: I agree, and would suggest questioning whether the revenue from the ads (a) is worth the ‘sell out’ perception some readers may get, and (b) is worth the real estate that might be best used elsewhere.
    One thing you might try: Change your “my books” links to go through Amazon’s associates program (I don’t think they currently do), and place it higher on the blog, where you have teh ads section today. Now you’ve got audience-relevant advertising (readers of your blog being perhaps likely candidates to buy your books – it’s how I came to buy AotS).

  60. alek April 12, 2006 at 12:23 pm

    Guy,
    Per point #8, if you ever stop blogging, I’ll stop reading your blog … and where can I get a SCUBA tank?!? 😉

  61. Lisa McGrath April 12, 2006 at 1:33 pm

    Guy-
    Congrats on 100 days. Been reading your blog since N-TEN. Your content is helpful and inspiring. Keep it up … and thanks!

  62. lenkov April 12, 2006 at 2:46 pm

    Guy,
    For “automatically-generated table of contents” you may try to use http://feeddigest.com

  63. Marian Crkon April 12, 2006 at 4:30 pm

    Sounds like you need Smart Archive (Word Press plugin) for your prior posts (not just last 10): http://justinblanton.com/projects/smartarchives/
    Marian

  64. David Keys April 12, 2006 at 4:37 pm

    Guy:
    Please reassure your wife that you are in fact changing the world every day. Personally I think 15,000 a day is too modest, because you can’t know about, and therefore underestimate, the effect that your disciples are having.
    I’m a huge fan, up in the Great White North, where, by the way, it was 70 degrees today. I look for new posts every day, devoured the Art of the Start in a day and buy a copy for each company I work with.
    I’ve repeatedly said that The Art of the Start is the best technology oriented business book I’ve ever read.
    For context I’ve read all of Geoffrey Moore’s books, and by the way, have also met him in person and spent a few days at with him at a corporate planning session. I don’t want to take anything way from the Chasm Group, but I frankly believe that your style is more effective and much more relevant to the young entrepreneur.
    Please keep it up.
    David

  65. Kelly April 13, 2006 at 12:53 am

    Only 100 days? Why does it seem like longer?
    >>5. An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogger who experts.
    Amen!
    >>9 a. I don’t get this “exchanging links” thing. IMHO, you should link to a blog if you believe it’s good for your readership. The other blogger should link to back your blog if she believes it’s good for her readership.
    I disagree. I link to who and what I like to read. I like to share the goodness with anyone who happens upon it. I’ve never even thought to link to someone because it benefits me in any way. It a bit like inviting someone famous to a birthday party in order to attract more and ‘better’ people. Ick.

  66. Murad James April 13, 2006 at 1:01 am

    I found Guy’s blog on Chuquet – I’m impressed – after 100 days he’s number 3 in the top 10 – I think that’s a first!

  67. Javier Marti April 13, 2006 at 2:50 am

    I love your point number 8, the issue of readers wanting to tell you how to do your blog. You made the point clearly.
    Each one of us has different personalities and different goals for our blogs. I think it is healthy that we are true to ourselves in the blogs, even if these “readers” stop coming. What are they giving us, anyway? Why do they keep on coming if they don’t like us?
    You can never please everyone, you know it. And blogs are a pretty good way to remind us that every day…
    BTW, I see your last post is about customer service. Coincidentally, mine today is similar…
    regards!
    http://niquel757.blogspot.com

  68. VK Narayanan April 13, 2006 at 4:41 am

    Chanced upon to your blog today via tompeters.com’s tpwireservice. Excellent introspections.
    We are great fans of your books. What do you think in considering blogging as a best investment which directly make it to the market.
    PS: We have linked you from our blog to stay in touch. Cheers!

  69. Vicki Davis April 13, 2006 at 3:12 pm

    You are an exceptional blogger and are making a difference.
    I echo many of your thoughts, particularly on wanting to be an essayist.
    Me too, Guy. I aspire to be an essayist. An inspiration. A motivation.
    A connection with other teachers of all kinds, ages, and walks to tell them that amidst their days of exhaustion and frustration they are producing a beautiful thing.
    Like Michealangelo working on the Sistine Chapel — sometimes we are too close to see the beauty of the art that is being created in the lives of our students!
    I have passion on my topic of teaching and education too but I read you daily because you inspire me.

  70. Caleb April 13, 2006 at 3:47 pm

    A quick addition to #3: an article writer who blogs.
    One might think that’s the same as an essayist,but I disagree because essays rarely make good articles for the simple fact essays are usually BORING while an article writer has the task of captivating readers…
    And blogging that article adds more marketing value.

  71. Andrew Kossmann April 13, 2006 at 4:12 pm

    Guy, Love reading your stuff. Keep up the good work.
    A Fan.

  72. Jack Yan April 13, 2006 at 5:41 pm

    One of your best posts, Guy! I have wanted to summarize my thoughts being a relatively new regular blogger as well. I love number eight!

  73. מוניטור 2.0 April 14, 2006 at 3:06 am

    An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogger who experts

    גיא קוואסקי חוגג מאה ימי בלוגינג מאושרים, וגוגל מכריח עורכים לנסח כותרות לא מתחכמותגיא קוואסקי חוגג

  74. Mary Beth April 14, 2006 at 9:58 am

    >>9 a. I don’t get this “exchanging links” thing. IMHO, you should link to a blog if you believe it’s good for your readership. The other blogger should link to back your blog if she believes it’s good for her readership.
    I disagree. I link to who and what I like to read. I like to share the goodness with anyone who happens upon it. << Me too - goes back to the original concept of "surfing the web" that you find one site, follow the links, follow those links, find things you might never have known about otherwise. Although searching was a "someday" when I started, it's still fun to find things that other people have found and thought good/important enough to link on their page. I pretty much ignore the requests to exchange links that I get. sometimes I check out the sites but they're often just commercial and not very good. Table of contents: on TypePad, isn't that what categorization and archiving does for you? It's the whole UI thing - you only have 100 days now, not much to dig through but in awhile people will need ways to sift through your entries.

  75. Monica April 14, 2006 at 12:02 pm

    Assuming that typepad.com has the same templating system as Movable type, setting up a Simple Table of Contents is simple.
    I tried to post the how-to here in the comments but it actually got a little involved. Full instructions are on this blog entry:
    http://geeked.fibergeek.com/2006/04/tinkering_with_typepad_movable.html

  76. bob corrigan April 14, 2006 at 12:57 pm

    Lovely recap of your first 100 days. What are you planning to do differently for the next 100? I’m looking forward to reading how your perspective has changed/evolved (or not) come the end of July.

  77. Robert Millard April 14, 2006 at 4:24 pm

    If you come across a ‘table of contents’ like you describe, please blog about it – I’d love to hear about it. My blog ‘Aventure of Strategy’ (www.robmillard.com) is rapidly developing into almost a mini-MBA resource for professional services, but would be MUCH more effective with a proper table of contents or index.
    Rob Millard.

  78. bob corrigan April 14, 2006 at 9:09 pm

    Nice ad, Robert.

  79. BusinessBlogWire April 15, 2006 at 10:01 am

    How Hard Is It To Make Money Blogging?

    Many people wonder how difficult or easy it is to make money from blogging. The answer depends on many factors, but it mostly boils down to this: the more intelligently you use your blog, the more likely you are to…

  80. Louis April 15, 2006 at 9:15 pm

    Guy,
    Thanks for bringing the true meaning of being a Mensch to the blogosphere. Checking in on your blog is like attending a virtual lecture, thanks for a great education.

  81. john April 16, 2006 at 9:25 am

    Re: 9 a
    I’m in full agrrement re reciprocation, so go ahead and recommend my nascent blog safe in the knowledge that you won’t be getting anything in return!

  82. TheAlphaMarketer April 16, 2006 at 2:07 pm

    Guy Kawasaki and Darren Rowse say they don’t make much money on their blogs!

  83. TheAlphaMarketer April 16, 2006 at 4:30 pm

    Guy Kawasaki and Darren Rowse say they don’t make much money on their blogs! – part 5

    This post I’ll show you one of the secrets to monetizing blogs and websites. Most online marketers that make good income practice this. When I first started out, I made the mistake of not doing it and it cost me…

  84. TheAlphaMarketer April 16, 2006 at 4:37 pm

    Guy Kawasaki and Darren Rowse say they don’t make much money on their blogs! – part 5

    This post I’ll show you one of the secrets to monetizing blogs and websites. Most online marketers that make good income practice this. When I first started out, I made the mistake of not doing it and it cost me…

  85. martin April 16, 2006 at 4:39 pm

    the first book i read that you’ve authored is “how to drive your competition crazy” (the cover and title attracted my attention). I got it off a book sale for next to nothing. And I absolutely loved it. That being said, you’d know what I think about your blog. Let the good times roll!
    kaw-wa-bung-saki!

  86. TheAlphaMarketer April 16, 2006 at 4:40 pm

    Guy Kawasaki and Darren Rowse say they don’t make much money on their blogs!

  87. Another Day in the Antz Farm April 16, 2006 at 9:28 pm

    100 Days Report – Observations of a Nouveau Blogger

    I am very fond of Guy Kawasaki’s blog because he shares many bite sized insighful observations about…

  88. Fred Schoeneman April 17, 2006 at 10:06 am

    Guy,
    You write: “9 a. I don’t get this “exchanging links” thing. IMHO, you should link to a blog if you believe it’s good for your readership. The other blogger should link to back your blog if she believes it’s good for her readership. In a perfect world, linking is about quality, not reciprocation, with all due respect to Dr. Cialdini. :-)”
    I used to believe this, but don’t so much anymore. What I think is a better way to handle this is to organize your links in such a way that people who’re looking for business advice — the core of your readership — have a list of links they can go through, and then a list of links to blogs not related to your core readership, or people who’re just friendly, in a less visible part of your homepage. You wouldn’t even have to link them all, just one single link to the friendly folks.
    It’s analogous to those situations where you’re trying to get ahold of a VP of Engineering, and rather than try to bluff your way past a gatekeeper or be a jerk to him/her, you treat them with respect because a) it’s the right thing to do and b) you never know what they can do for you or what can come from serendipity. You don’t have to give those links the same priority, but the linkers really do appreciate it. And it’s the right thing to do.
    So yeah, link to everyone, just have categories for easier navigation by your core readership. I’ve never seen people object to their links being categorized.
    regards,
    f

  89. raj April 17, 2006 at 6:50 pm

    Guy,
    For the “Dear Abby” thing, the closest solution available is to set up a community forum. You can set up some initial topic threads.
    Anyone who wants to ask a question (or answer one) registers first. Their info (minimal details or maximum – your choice) are stored in a database. Members can create new topic threads, if you allow them to.
    Check out Drupal.org for the Drupal software, which has great forum/ community-based features. The only drawback is that Drupal requires your hosting provider to allow certain database privileges. Neither of my two providers allow this, so I’m not set up. Check out Performancing.com’s forums. (Andy did a piece on the main page a few days ago.)

  90. Bill Bradbury April 18, 2006 at 2:25 pm

    great post Guy! Glad to see that you have a blog. I used to really enjoy your column in Macworld. Even sketched out some ideas for “the art of the start” but never got far enough with them to submit for that contest. Anyway, I’ll be reading…. Bill

  91. john t unger April 20, 2006 at 9:18 am

    Guy, as for the idea of a “Dear Abby” column in number 6, here’s a suggestion:
    1. Do a blog post letting people know that you are now taking questions for your advice column. Explain in the post that they can leave questions for you in the comments, and that you will answer the questions as a separate, new blog post.
    2. Place a link to the advice column post in your sidebar with a title like “Ask Guy Kawasaki.” Now it will always be accessible.
    3. You can quote the comment that you’re answering in the body of your post, (including the permalink of the comment). When you answer the question, go to the advice column post and link to the answer post in the comments, so that readers can find the answer to the question.

  92. Internet Marketing Dude April 20, 2006 at 10:33 pm

    I am just about to create my first blog so lots of great information here.

  93. Raul April 27, 2006 at 4:12 am

    Raul

    Mario Jarvis Reuben

  94. Antisyphus: risky business for a change July 12, 2006 at 9:56 pm

    Welcome to Antisyphus

    In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was quite an intelligent fellow. Unfortunately, it’s believed that his ethics left more than a little to be desired. After irritating the Gods one time too many, Sisyphus was punished by spending eternity rolling a boulder

  95. Robert Bruce July 27, 2006 at 12:51 am

    Aw jeeesh Guy, why the frig did you have to go and post # 5. “An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogger who experts.”
    That’s is. I have to quit blogging now. I’m done. It’s all over. Bring the curtains down. Kaput. Fini. I am dog mess on your diamond soled Hi-tecs. Als ist kla.
    Pass the razor blade.

  96. iScatterlings July 27, 2006 at 1:07 am

    YOU CAN BLAME GUY KAWASAKI

    I posted this comment at Guy Kawasakis site. Go read this magnificant article about his first 100 days as a blogger.
    Aw jeeesh Guy, why the frig did you have to go and post # 5. An expert who blogs is more interesting than a blogge…

  97. Mike July 28, 2006 at 1:55 am

    I’m enjoying your blog all the way from Lagos Nigeria. And all the ‘plugs’ and ‘links’ to other sites are great. Keep them coming. By the way I’m trying to download the Majora video from TED … it might take 40 hours with this connection. I hope it’s worth it 🙂
    -Mike

  98. Doug Karr August 13, 2006 at 10:29 am

    Great post, fun blog!
    Thanks!

  99. Hamilton Chua August 21, 2006 at 8:00 am

    What a coincidence ! I started blogging at about the same time you started.
    To be honest, I haven’t read any one of your books or attended any of your talks but the more I read your blog, the more I’m convinced that I just have to get your books. No shitake ! 🙂

  100. James von Feldt August 27, 2006 at 1:55 pm

    You mentioned that you wanted to do a “Dear Abby” thing…I may have it wrong but I interpreted that statement to mean that you would like to accumulate a lot of problem statements from people that you could respond to. If I am correct, the following cite may have the automated format you want.
    Check out the Gary North Questions& Answers site at http://mail.google.com/mail/?auth=DQAAAHQAAABZVu
    QBxX-wHWj-fthuRBSty26dvBWJm-eH6IBC2JEC2ZgCw76ZEtA-SFEmnrUb8rWrDFUglq3FYWqYolujMUNna0GzeBlBsblzXgPZh4Av4chpVn9zNa_ZvDO6EdXy_gP9J6yb2-IxdKOK0BPIYx–NbaplXyCegtWp7QLS6CZng
    …a comment on your 12/20/30 rule. Very good idea. I’ve got a lot of students who need that one. Check out http://www.i3mm.blogspot.com/ for an uncommonly clear set of tips for the use of PP to communicate. This cite is almost all examples with clear principles.
    love your topic

  101. Johannes August 28, 2006 at 12:50 am

    great site with good look and information… i like it

  102. Website Content Writer & Freelance Copywriter August 30, 2006 at 3:29 pm

    Does blogging make money?

    I was just now reading Guy Kawasakis Observations of a Nouveau Blogger, and although he must have mentioned it in a light vein, this portion got me thinking:
    Its hard to make money blogging. The advertising revenues dont add up to…

  103. Ranjeet Sodhi September 7, 2006 at 9:47 am

    You have a knack for making even the most boring subject an interesting read…
    Seriously: ever considered publishing (print version) some of the similar topic articles on your blog into a book of small articles?
    I would certainly buy such a book if you ever compiled it.

  104. Chris October 16, 2006 at 2:04 am

    Excellent post it helps keep everything in perspective. I have been reading your blog from close to when it first started. I have enjoyed the growing conversation. 100 days can have a big impact on a lot of people.

  105. Andrei Ignat November 14, 2006 at 2:43 pm

    It is better, in the long run, to can influence 15.000 people rather than make money( although the money are not bad either)

  106. Geetha Krishnan November 23, 2006 at 2:48 am

    Hi Guy, came back to this after a long time today. Have made a post on my blog on the second point you had made – the use of the perpendicular pronoun in blog posts. Here’s the permalink to it – http://simply-speaking.blogspot.com/2006/11/whos-blog-is-it-anyway.html.

  107. Malcolm December 9, 2006 at 9:51 am

    Nice one. Provides some inspiration for me to try and to keep my Blog going.

  108. Onlineshops December 14, 2006 at 1:20 am

    Wow. Very impressive.
    Supreme concept of a personalized web portal.
    I look forward to using this as my browsers’ start page.
    Keep up the good work!

  109. oyunlar January 5, 2007 at 4:42 pm

    Nice one. Provides some inspiration for me to try and to keep my Blog going.

  110. Worldwide Success January 9, 2007 at 9:00 pm

    Las Razones Superiores Por Tener un Blog. Y sí, Algunas Personas Están Tornándose Ricas con Su Blog

    Tener un Blog puede ser mucho trabajo como algunos bloggers puenden atestiguar. Pero hay centenares de millares de gente blogando diariamente. ¿Por qué las personas hacen un blog? Alguna gente lo hace por dinero. D…

  111. Animate It! January 23, 2007 at 10:57 pm

    Hi. Number 8 here. Just pissed off about Myspace being idiots. I like cheese and bread.

  112. Meble February 4, 2007 at 4:09 am

    Enjoyed browsing through the site. Keep up the good work. Thanks and Greetings from Poland

  113. Martin Lindsey March 9, 2007 at 1:55 am

    Hey guy, great blog man. Yes, technorati is working for you. I just found your blog on the 100 most popular list and I just subscribed.
    Great writing. You sound like an “actionist” so I’m a fan. And, oh yeah, that SCUBA analogy is priceless.
    Have a great weekend and keep up the outstanding blog.

  114. Andreas March 26, 2007 at 1:19 am

    It´s a very interesting Blog and simple answer of many questions.

  115. hannes April 14, 2007 at 7:30 am

    “I’m changing the world, 15,000 people at a time.”
    I wish more people would say that instead of “I am making money”.

  116. sabah seri ilan May 4, 2007 at 5:37 am

    good site

  117. College Marketing 4.0 May 12, 2007 at 8:02 pm

    The First 100 Days: So You Thought You Wanted to be a Blogger

    100 Days of Blogging…ridiculous.To completely copy Guy Kawasaki, here’s a top ten list of things I’ve learned about blogging…life…love…well really just blogging. 10 If it’s about money…walk away. I’m not going to lie…I thought blogging migh…

  118. Tapeten June 7, 2007 at 2:37 am

    Great and excellent article t’s realy helpful. Thanks again.
    Wow. Very impressive

  119. Raul Harper June 11, 2007 at 3:40 pm

    I like the words: “some men make the blog, and some blogs make the man”. Change the world is a good reason to make a blog.

  120. Bürobedarf June 16, 2007 at 2:33 pm

    Thanks for very interesting article. btw. I really enjoyed reading all of your posts. It’s interesting to read ideas, and observations from someone else’s point of view… makes you think more. So please keep up the great work. Greetings.

  121. Shine July 16, 2007 at 12:43 am

    Thanks for the very honest account of your first 100 days (though it’s been quite some time ago now…) Can’t agree more on the linking thing – wouldn’t have imagined so many people ask for link exchange / votes simply because they are going to do the same for you, even though they have not really visited your site…
    Very enjoyable substantial blog. Will come back often and get a copy of your books to read through.

  122. Tyler July 19, 2007 at 12:57 pm

    Hi Guy,
    I want to do a “Dear Abby” column in which people post questions, and I answer. These can’t be comments tied to a specific post because they would get buried. I’d like to create an archive of questions and answers that people can search. I looked at a couple of Wiki products, but I didn’t have the mental energy to adapt them to my needs.
    I recently started a web site based on a similar idea. You can find it at www.wikivice.com. It is mostly a stock MediaWiki, with a couple of minor addons and modifications. There’s not much content right now, but I’m hoping to build up a community in the near future.

  123. Comments are closed.