The Art of Bootstrapping

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Someone once told me that the probability of an entrepreneur getting venture capital is the same as getting struck by lightning while standing at the bottom of a swimming pool on a sunny day. This may be too optimistic.

Let’s say that you can’t raise money for whatever reason: You’re not a “proven” team with “proven” technology in a “proven” market. Or, your company may simply not be a “VC deal”–that is, something that will go public or be acquired for a zillion dollars. Finally, your organization may be a not-for-product with a cause like the ministry or the environment. Does this mean you should give up? Not at all.

I could build a case that too much money is worse than too little for most organizations—not that I wouldn’t like to run a Super Bowl commercial someday. Until that day comes, the key to success is bootstrapping. The term comes from the German legend of Baron Münchhausen pulling himself out of the sea by pulling on his own bootstraps. Here is the art of bootstrapping.

  1. Focus on cash flow, not profitability. The theory is that profits are the key to survival. If you could pay the bills with theories, this would be fine. The reality is that you pay bills with cash, so focus on cash flow. If you know you are going to bootstrap, you should start a business with a small up-front capital requirement, short sales cycles, short payment terms, and recurring revenue. It means passing up the big sale that take twelve months to close, deliver, and collect. Cash is not only king, it’s queen and prince too for a bootstrapper.
  2. Forecast from the bottom up. Most entrepreneurs do a top-down forecast: “There are 150 million cars in America. It sure seems reasonable that we can get a mere 1% of car owners to install our satellite radio systems. That’s 1.5 million systems in the first year.” The bottom-up forecast goes like this: “We can open up ten installation facilities in the first year. On an average day, they can install ten systems. So our first year sales will be 10 facilities x 10 systems x 240 days = 24,000 satellite radio systems. 24,000 is a long way from the conservative 1.5 million systems in the top-down approach. Guess which number is more likely to happen.
  3. Ship, then test. I can feel the comments coming in already: How can you recommend shipping stuff that isn’t perfect? Blah blah blah. ”Perfect“ is the enemy of ”good enough.“ When your product or service is ”good enough,“ get it out because cash flows when you start shipping. Besides perfection doesn’t necessarily come with time–more unwanted features do. By shipping, you’ll also learn what your customers truly want you to fix. It’s definitely a tradeoff: your reputation versus cash flow, so you can’t ship pure crap. But you can’t wait for perfection either. (Nota bene: life science companies, please ignore this recommendation.)
  4. Forget the ”proven“ team. Proven teams are over-rated–especially when most people define proven teams as people who worked for a billion dollar company for the past ten years. These folks are accustomed to a certain lifestyle, and it’s not the bootstrapping lifestyle. Hire young, cheap, and hungry people. People with fast chips, but not necessarily a fully functional instruction set. Once you achieve significant cash flow, you can hire adult supervision. Until then, hire what you can afford and make them into great employees.
  5. Start as a service business. Let’s say that you ultimately want to be a software company: people download your software or you send them CDs, and they pay you. That’s a nice, clean business with a proven business model. However, until you finish the software, you could provide consulting and services based on your work-in-process software. This has two advantages: immediate revenue and true customer testing of your software. Once the software is field-tested and battle-hardened, flip the switch and become a product company.
  6. Focus on function, not form. Mea culpa: I love good ”form.“ MacBooks. Audis. Graf skates. Bauer sticks. Breitling watches. You name it. But bootstrappers focus on function, not form, when they are buying things. The function is computing, getting from point A to point B, skating, shooting, and knowing the time of day. These functions do not require the more expensive form that I like. All the chair has to do is hold your butt. It doesn’t have to look like it belongs in the Museum of Modern Art. Design great stuff, but buy cheap stuff.
  7. Pick your battles. Bootstrappers pick their battles. They don’t fight on all fronts because they cannot afford to fight on all fronts. If you were starting a new church, do you really need the $100,000 multimedia audio visual system? Or just a great message from the pulpit? If you’re creating a content web site based on the advertising model, do you have to write your own customer ad-serving software? I don’t think so.
  8. Understaff. Many entrepreneurs staff up for what could happen, best case. ”Our conservative (albeit top-down) forecast for first year satellite radio sales is 1.5 million units. We’d better create a 24 x 7 customer support center to handle this. Guess what? You sell no where near 1.5 million units, but you do have 200 people hired, trained, and sitting in a 50,000 square foot telemarketing center. Bootstrappers understaff knowing that all hell might break loose. But this would be, as we say in Silicon Valley, a “high quality problem.” Trust me, every venture capitalist fantasizes about an entrepreneur calling up and asking for additional capital because sales are exploding. Also trust me when I tell you that fantasies are fantasies because they seldom happen.
  9. Go direct. The optimal number of mouths (or hands) between a bootstrapper and her customer is zero. Sure, stores provide great customer reach, and wholesalers provide distribution. But God invented ecommerce so that you could sell direct and reap greater margins. And God was doubly smart because She knew that by going direct, you’d also learn more about your customer’s needs. Stores and wholesalers fill demand, they don’t create it. If you create enough demand, you can always get other organizations to fill it later. If you don’t create demand, all the distribution in the world will get you bupkis.
  10. Position against the leader. Don’t have the money to explain your story starting from scratch? Then don’t try. Instead position against the leader. Toyota introduced Lexus as good as a Mercedes but at half the price–Toyota didn’t have to explain what “good as a Mercedes” meant. How much do you think that saved them? “Cheap iPod” and “poor man’s Bose noise-cancelling headphones,” would work too.
  11. Take the “red pill.”This refers to the choice that Neo made in The Matrix. The red pill led to learning the whole truth. The blue pill meant waking up wondering if you had a bad dream. Bootstrappers don’t have the luxury to take the blue pill. They take the red pill–everyday–to find out how deep the rabbit hole really is. And the deepest rabbit hole for a bootstrapper is a simple calculation: Amount of cash divided by cash burn per month because this will tell you how much longer you can live. And as my friend Craig Johnson likes to say, “The leading cause of failure of startups is death, and death happens when you run out of money.” As long as you have money, you’re still in the game.

Written at: Atherton, California.

By | 2016-10-24T14:29:10+00:00 January 26th, 2006|Categories: Entrepreneurship, Innovation|124 Comments

About the Author:

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. Formerly, he was an advisor to the Motorola business unit of Google and chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of Social Media, The Art of the Start, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

124 Comments

  1. BizImpresario January 26, 2006 at 12:27 am - Reply

    Collecting for a Healthy Cash Flow

    Getting Cash Flow into your business is critical for healthy growth.

  2. BizImpresario January 26, 2006 at 12:29 am - Reply

    Collecting for a Healthy Cash Flow

    Getting Cash Flow into your business is critical for healthy growth.

  3. James Clark January 26, 2006 at 12:33 am - Reply

    Guy, point one is so critical and often times entrepreneurs get caught up in the winning the business, staffing up for it and don’t focus on getting paid for it.
    My partner and I in my current business made a blood handshake about how we would not back down from requesting a certain level of payment upfront before we begin a project.
    I found that the clients actually begin to respect us more, and for those prospects that didn’t agree, well they probably wouldn’t have paid us anyway.

  4. Thomas Witt January 26, 2006 at 1:10 am - Reply

    Guy,
    thanks for this inspiring article. I would perfectly agree on all of it, except No. 6. The longer I’m into software business I’m realizing how important a great user experience is.
    I’d rather ship a good enough functionality but focus on a great experience. Mainly you’ve only got one shot.
    I agree that it’s desirable but not absolutely neccessary to have star designers design your product. But the ease-of-use and the user experience is a very important point in my point of view.

  5. Pelle January 26, 2006 at 1:24 am - Reply

    I’m a big believer in bootstrapping and am doing it myself.
    Even if your business is VC financable, I think it’s best to reach the point where you have a real (albeit small) business before you loose focus and start the search for financing.
    Too many startups spend all their time on busines plans, angel investors, VC’s and what have you when they would have a much better chance if they focused on their business.
    On my blog I’m journaling my own experiences as a bootstrapper.
    While there is a real level of frustration at times (my current source of funding is consulting, which eats up most of my time) I still have more time to do my business than if I was doing the whole bplan->VC circuit, which I have done in prior startups.

  6. Dennis T Cheung January 26, 2006 at 2:03 am - Reply

    “Ship, then test.”
    I believe the new trend is to call it “Beta” then test 🙂

  7. Steve Cook January 26, 2006 at 2:25 am - Reply

    Great article Guy. I was inspired to bootstrap my company after reading The Bootstrappers Bible from Seth Godin (http://www.changethis.com/8.BootstrappersBible).
    Another reason for bootstrapping of course is to build value in a company while retaining financial control. If my idea is worth bupkiss, then if I build it myself for a year or two I may be able to then position it better on the market. Of course, we build for growth rather than for acquisition, but one can dream…
    Bootstrapping is tough and unglamorous though. When I read of people getting $200 000 in their first round of funding it sounds like silly money to me. My product development is funded by working hard at consulting gigs that (just about) pay the bills.

  8. Dan Kravman January 26, 2006 at 2:46 am - Reply

    This is an excellent article! I especially liked points #2 and #8 – they were very insightful.
    Thank you for writing this.
    I have added it to my del.icio.us bookmarks and submitted it to reddit.
    Once again, thank you.

  9. Gordon January 26, 2006 at 3:57 am - Reply

    Hi Guy and fellow commentators,
    First: Thank you, Guy, for the post. Those of us in the sticks (and under the radar) need just this sort of support.
    I’m funding my development doing contracting work, not consulting.
    Thomas Witt, I agree wholeheartedly. One needs some element of differentiation from the OSS movement and the entrenched competition. Good design always helps – think Apple 😉
    I’ve been planning things for a while, strategy – not formal BP, and am happy to have your confirmation of my approach.
    Thanks again,
    Gordon

  10. Samir January 26, 2006 at 4:41 am - Reply

    Hello Guy,
    Another fantastic post. Thanks for this.
    I only disagree on one point: design. Let’s face it, design IS what will lead customers to choose your product. Functionality is important. But you said it yourself: what you expect from a chair is to hold your butt. What you expect from a car is to drive you from point A to point B. That’s for the function. I want people to look at me driving my car from point A to point B and say WOW! Who is he? A movie star? A successful VC? I want my colleagues to come into my office and genuflect when they see my chair. Only design and I insist on the word “only”, can really help you differentiate your product in this age of abundance. OK, if someone invents a machine that let’s say can make you invisible, he doesn’t have to bother on how his machine is going to look like (look at the first car…not really fancy). But as the product becomes more mainstream, the only way to differentiate and add significance to it is design.

  11. Charlene Chong January 26, 2006 at 4:41 am - Reply

    Absolutely. Ship then test. We didn’t even know what in the world we were selling till our customers spoke. We thought we were selling A, but our customers thought we were selling B, so B we sold. The customer is KING!
    Point 4 – now I’m forcing my team to read this. You guys ROCK! You are young (and gorgeous) and super hungry. That’s world domination material – and nope, I haven’t had my wine yet.
    Thanks for the great post, Guy.

  12. lifehack.org January 26, 2006 at 5:42 am - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    In entrepreneurship, it is not the end of the world if you cannot get venture capital. Without any funds from venture capital, you still could launch your product or services by bootstrapping your business. Guy Kawasaki has posted an article called Th…

  13. Wintermute's Blog January 26, 2006 at 6:49 am - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    As someone who has managed a tech support crew, I thought I’d comment on the fourth point. If you follow this advice, you won’t need to hire adult supervision later. Your young, cheap, hungry people will prove themselves by the time you achieve signi…

  14. Kendall January 26, 2006 at 7:52 am - Reply

    I think the idea of going from the bottom up is a really helpful idea to try and figure out cashflow and a realistic approach to forecasting. Thanks for this post. As someone who is trying to bootstrap an idea it’s really helpful.

  15. franki durbin January 26, 2006 at 8:31 am - Reply

    Guy,
    Thanks for taking time write such “meaty” posts. #1 and #5 definitely resonate with my business experience. You can have revenue coming out your eyes, but if your cash flow is off…you’re sinking. Keep up the great writing. It’s a great read each day.

  16. theCreator January 26, 2006 at 9:17 am - Reply

    Ship, then test?
    A dangerous tactic that can backfire anytime.

  17. davemerwin.com January 26, 2006 at 9:22 am - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    Let the Good Times Roll by Guy Kawasaki: The Art of Bootstrapping
    The rules of the game. Fail cheap fail often is #12.

  18. John Bacon January 26, 2006 at 9:43 am - Reply

    In your post you said that, “Perfect” is the enemy of “good enough.” Didn’t Jim Collins have a similar statement? I think it was something like, “good enough is the enemy of great.”

  19. Guy Kawasaki January 26, 2006 at 10:11 am - Reply

    Re: Design
    I’m not saying the design of the products you sell doesn’t matter. I’m saying that if you’re bootstrapping, the coolness/design of the products your’re buying doesn’t matter.
    Guy

  20. Fine James January 26, 2006 at 10:30 am - Reply

    And if all else fails, find a good contingency lawyer and sue the living hell out of someone, anyone.

  21. Betsy Devine January 26, 2006 at 10:38 am - Reply

    “Ship then test:” Your point #9 is what makes this work.
    That, and flashing back fast to unhappy customers, whether their bug reports show up in email, IM, or (shudder) angry blogposts. At least, that’s how we did it back when I was working for Feedster.

  22. Wezee January 26, 2006 at 10:42 am - Reply

    Another term for bootstrapping –known to many from inner city backgrounds– is HUSSTLING! Though,many view the term husstling as a negative thing. This post describes what it is to be a true HUSSTLER…definitely a post to be put in any entrepreneur’s bible.

  23. Paul January 26, 2006 at 10:58 am - Reply

    Hi Guy,
    I like the post. However, I thought people might like to hear how a web 2.0 company is doing it in the trenches.
    http://pauledmondson.blogspot.com/2006/01/boot-strapping-web-20-style.html

  24. Stacy January 26, 2006 at 11:05 am - Reply

    This is quite timely Guy, and, I can see where it would apply to a non-profit with some tweaks as well as a non-tech service idea that I’m developing. #3 reminds of “ready, fire, aim”. You just have to take action and adjust it as you go. Gosh, if I had this much fun learning back in school, I would have graduated in my sophmore year! Thanks again for some insightful and delightful wisedom.

  25. Craig S. Cottingham January 26, 2006 at 11:14 am - Reply

    “We can open up ten installation facilities in the first year. On an average day, they can install five systems. So our first year sales will be 10 facilities x 10 systems x 240 days = 24,000 satellite radio systems.”
    Maybe this head cold is worse than I thought, but shouldn’t that equation be 10 facilities x 5 systems x 240 days = 12,000 satellite radio systems?

  26. Eric Christiansen January 26, 2006 at 11:20 am - Reply

    Guy,
    So why not keep this mentality in an organization?
    Seems like most organizations get to a point of “fat and lazy” and then the next group of lean, hungry thugs show up, take the lunch of the satisfied group and kick sand in their faces to boot as they shift the market.

  27. Lifehacker January 26, 2006 at 2:01 pm - Reply

    Small Biz Tip: Bootstrapping advice

    Entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki has some great advice for people bootstrapping their own business. Focus on cash flow, not profitability. The theory is that profits are the key to survival. If you could pay the bills with theories, this would be…

  28. Matthew Price January 26, 2006 at 2:02 pm - Reply

    Shipping before testing is a good way to completely destroy your reputation and credibility.

  29. JeffT January 26, 2006 at 3:23 pm - Reply

    I love this post! Here’s a nice quote for all my fellow “ready, fire, aim” folks out there:
    “Success is going from failure to failure without a loss of enthusiasm.”
    Winston Churchill
    Just don’t run out of money.

  30. Allthatscool.com January 26, 2006 at 4:17 pm - Reply

    The art of Bootstraping

    Guy Kawasaki has a excellent post about Bootstrapping. Go Check it out. technorati tags: ceo, guy+kawaski, bootstrap…

  31. Startup Fever January 26, 2006 at 4:48 pm - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    Guy Kawasaki explains the art of bootstrapping:
    Lets say that you cant raise money for whatever reason: Youre not a “proven” team with “proven” technology in a “proven” market. Or, your company may simply not be a “…

  32. Christopher St. John January 26, 2006 at 7:06 pm - Reply

    In reference to point #2 “Forecast from the bottom up”, it’s probably good to note that just because you go with the bottom-up forecast doesn’t mean you don’t have to do a top-down forecast to establish some limits. If your bottom-up forecast says you can produce 10,000 widgets a day, but the global market for widgets is only 1000 total, then there’s a disconnect that has to be resolved.

  33. M January 26, 2006 at 7:23 pm - Reply

    Guy, great advice, especially about cash flows, and buying only what is necessary in function.
    In making functional purchase decisions, other factors such as the hidden costs involved.
    For example, a color printer which seems like a good bargain and have the same feature set and $50 cheaper than the industry average, the purchaser might find themselves in trouble later when it comes to obtaining toner for this printer, because of the cost of the cartridges or the shipping charges associated with it amount to more than the comparisson.
    You don’t want to get saddled with junk, so take the time to research the options to make the decisions.

  34. stevedoria.net January 26, 2006 at 7:33 pm - Reply

    http://blog.stevedoria.net/20060126/59

    Guy Kawasaki reinforces ideas about starting up companies and reminds people about the basics in The Art of Bootstrapping. The post can be seen as a good summary of important suggestions made in business literature.
    Forecasting from the bottom up is a …

  35. Christopher St. John January 26, 2006 at 7:56 pm - Reply

    In reference to point #2 “Forecast from the bottom up”, it’s probably good to note that just because you go with the bottom-up forecast doesn’t mean you don’t have to do a top-down forecast to establish some limits. If your bottom-up forecast says you can produce 10,000 widgets a day, but the global market for widgets is only 1000 total, then there’s a disconnect that has to be resolved.

  36. bd handspicker January 26, 2006 at 9:25 pm - Reply

    Another great post. Thanks Guy!
    Focus on cash flow (1), ship, the test (3), focus on function (6) and start as a service business (5) go hand-in-hand. “Short money” keeps the company going. A live company has a better chance of getting to “long money” and even better products than a dead company. It’s that simple.
    Ship, then test (3), true customer testing (5) and focus on function (6) is not about shipping bad products, but rather about getting useable product into the hands of your customers as soon as possible – not just to get early revenue, but also to enlist the customer in customer-centered design of your product. Your customers know you are a startup, so there is no sense blowing smoke up their nether regions by pretending to be one of the big boys that (supposedly) only release a product when it’s pretty and fully tested. Instead, turn that characteristic into a strength – the ability to be infinitely responsive to your early customers. They get a product that meets their real needs. You get invaluable feedback on your products and business. Your future customers get an even better product than you could create in the lab with never-ending “just one more fix/feature” polishing.
    WRT Forecast from the bottom up (2), keep in mind when budgeting that your constraint is not how much money you will have from investors or revenue, but how much time and resource bandwidth you have to dedicate to growth at any point in time. For instance, how many good engineers can you attract, manage the hiring of, and integrate into a team while at the same time continuing to produce product, service the customers and manage the organization. Corollary: hire enough managers along the way to support *future* growth – they need to be enculturated and seasoned in the company just like the individual contributors before they will be their most productive delivering results *and* growth.
    The most important rule: 11. Take the “red pill. As passionate entreprenuers we get in this game for the thrill of the product, the technology, or the sale. But we don’t get to have that thrill for long if we don’t stay on top of financial reality.

  37. Digger January 27, 2006 at 2:32 am - Reply

    I learned something from this entry. God is a woman!

  38. Aditya January 27, 2006 at 3:42 am - Reply

    start as a service company was a solution i didnt think of damn howcome i didnt think of that.
    One good advice in return for another one dnt you think the site is too simple?ur a colorful guy we knw how abt some design stuff here

  39. jcasimir January 27, 2006 at 3:52 am - Reply

    Here’s another question for the topic pool: what strategies should you use to manage charitable work, both for your individuals and your company as a whole?
    I thought this argument in Wired was pretty interesting:
    http://www.wired.com/news/columns/0,70072-0.html?tw=rss.technology

  40. Stan P. van de Burgt January 27, 2006 at 5:10 am - Reply

    Good article, Guy.
    #2 “We can open up ten installation facilities in the first year. On an average day, they can install five systems. So our first year sales will be 10 facilities x 10 systems x 240 days = 24,000 satellite radio systems.” Should be 10x5x240=12,000 as noted bove, but it’s even worse…
    The facilities won’t be there on day one. On day one, you have zero facilities, and at the end of the year 10, so 5 on average. Adding up to 5x5x240= 6,000
    I’ve seen this ‘mistake’ many times in business plans, at start-up and big corporates.
    #1: For B2B, don’t forget that companies tend to pay only after 40-60 days (or even 90-100 in some countries), even with short payment terms on your invoices. Big companies just ignore them and state that their own terms apply…

  41. Kingsley.Tagbo January 27, 2006 at 5:52 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki Blogs About The The Art of Bootstrapping

    Guy Kawasaki, a Venture Capitalist and inventor of modern day Hi-Tech evangelism blogs about the ‘The…

  42. mitch weisburgh January 27, 2006 at 6:39 am - Reply

    Ship then test, and you can be ….. Microsoft.
    Be good enough, not great, and you can be … Microsoft.
    Good design is not critical, and you can be … Microsoft.
    Okay, lesson learned, next.

  43. Bob Walsh January 27, 2006 at 7:10 am - Reply

    Great post Guy – every micro-ISV should nail this to the wall behind their monitor.
    I’d suggest one other point: pick carefully your place on the Long Tail. That is, find, define and be relevant to an unmet need out there that can be googled with a few keywords.

  44. My Micro-ISV January 27, 2006 at 8:05 am - Reply

    Guy’s 11 micro-ISV Commandments

    Guy Kawasaki’s latest post on the Art of Bootstrapping is such good advice, every micro-ISV should print it and read it until they know it by heart. Here’s the bullet point version, just to whet you appetite so you go…

  45. ToDoOrElse.com January 27, 2006 at 8:11 am - Reply

    Guy’s 11 micro-ISV Commandments

    (Posted first at http://mymicorisv.com) Guy Kawasaki’s latest post on the Art of Bootstrapping is such good advice, every micro-ISV should print it and read it until they know it by heart. Here’s the bullet point version, just to whet you appetite so y…

  46. Allthatscool.com January 27, 2006 at 8:18 am - Reply

    The art of Bootstrapping

    Guy Kawasaki has a excellent post about Bootstrapping. Go Check it out. technorati tags: ceo, guy+kawaski, bootstrap…

  47. Jonathan January 27, 2006 at 11:08 am - Reply

    >Craig Johnson likes to say, “The leading cause of failure of startups is death, and death happens when you run out of money.” As long as you have money, you’re still in the game.
    I like your blog postings – I can relate to a lot of what you are saying which is great! I think your buddy Craig is almost on the money, I would revise his saying by replacing money with sources of credit. I have been without money but still in the running thanks to credit, its when credit runs out that you are screwed 😉
    Jon
    Founder & CEO of myfoodcount.com
    Free, Anonymous and incredibly easy to use online health monitoring.

  48. Mukul KUmar January 27, 2006 at 12:10 pm - Reply

    Hi Guy.
    Excellent article. Very good points.
    There is also another good writeup on bootstrapping at the following blog:
    http://emergic.org/collections/tech_talk_bootstrapping_a_business.html
    Also, about point #10 – Position against the leader. About selling cheap, I met John Nesheim this Tuesday in Mumbai, and there was a discussion about – whether cheap could be a strategy. There is a thought that – somebody else (China) can always make cheaper products, therefore the day you come out with a cheaper product, somebody else will come out with a half priced product in 4 weeks. And you will loose your edge. Interesting conversation.
    Thanks,
    Mukul.
    http://mukulblog.blogspot.com/

  49. Fashion-Incubator January 27, 2006 at 12:30 pm - Reply

    Designer’s guide to a business plan

    Guy Kawasaki’s post on The Art of Bootstrapping yesterday inspired me to write my own list of most frequently offered advice to people starting a fashion or sewn products business. This list is intended to augment the information I’ve written…

  50. Fashion-Incubator January 27, 2006 at 12:31 pm - Reply

    Designer’s guide to a business plan

    Guy Kawasaki’s post on The Art of Bootstrapping yesterday inspired me to write my own list of most frequently offered advice to people starting a fashion or sewn products business. This list is intended to augment the information I’ve written…

  51. Donagh Kiernan January 27, 2006 at 1:40 pm - Reply

    Guy, my focus is on Business Development of Technology companies in Ireland…
    I somewhat agree with your comments on ‘Ship Then Test’ – Techies in Ireland have too much focus on their product and not on their sales.
    I find myself regularly saying “Sell what you can deliver,not what you have”.
    On this also, people dont always get it that your product doesnt have to have every feature of the competitors – look at How Palm took hold of the PDA market with a few simple but key functions.
    a good practical blog at last
    Donagh Kiernan

  52. Rishabh R. Dassani January 27, 2006 at 3:19 pm - Reply

    Interesting and very thought provoking, keep ’em coming, Guy!

  53. J. B. Rainsberger January 27, 2006 at 9:34 pm - Reply

    Normally I would be perturbed by seeing “Ship, then test”, because I would never want to ship low quality products. I would like to offer an alternative interpretation to Guy’s words: “Ship, then complete.”
    That is, ship good quality stuff with the first few important features, then fill the product out with the other features you want to ship. The iPod is a good example: I’ll bet the original vision for iPod included recorded music, AM/FM tuner, video, download from the web, wireless exchange between units, tiny form factor… but the first version was a little bigger and only handled recorded music. This means market testing (right features?), rather than product testing (does it work?).
    Agile software development embodies this idea of early release to create a quick revenue stream, which then subsidizes future development.

  54. Subramanian Rajagopal's Weblog January 28, 2006 at 12:10 pm - Reply

    Art of Bootstrapping by Guy Kawasaki

    As usual, Guy has exce;;ent advice in his new post, on theArt of Bootstrapping

  55. ToDoOrElse.com January 28, 2006 at 12:39 pm - Reply

    Guy’s 11 micro-ISV Commandments

    (Posted first at http://mymicroisv.com) Guy Kawasaki’s latest post on the Art of Bootstrapping is such good advice, every micro-ISV should print it and read it until they know it by heart. Here’s the bullet point version, just to whet you appetite so y…

  56. Mario January 28, 2006 at 1:21 pm - Reply

    maybe #3 (“ship, then test”) could be called in some other way.
    It is a known idea in software development but it’s probably a lot more about thinking about ship&test as parallel, not sequential.
    The old “release early, release often” sounds better to me.
    “ship, test, ship, test, ship, test” may be the real thing.
    Are you thinking about something different? different how?

  57. [email protected] January 29, 2006 at 4:39 am - Reply

    Bootstrapping?

    Really nice point by Guy Kawasaki: The Art of Bootstrapping, but nothing bright new. However, Id suggest you to give this post a look.

  58. anina.net January 29, 2006 at 2:15 pm - Reply

    hi guy! i am just a little fish in this big pond of entrepenurism, but i wanted to say first, i like so much your blog. it’s great for me to learn about the world of buisness. i am a fashion model and a fellow blogger.
    i just wanted to add to your list, remember gorilla marketing: use all your assets. be your assets, your staff members who are well poised to speak at conferences, expo’s, and more, who can be your spokes persons. be your assets your personal smile and charm coupled with goodwill. be your assets your network and connections. gorrilla marketing in stickers, fliers, and pins. gorilla marketing in terms of giving a bit of knowledge away on a blog, and saving the indepth stuff, as you said, for consulting. leveraging web 2.0 to bring your company a global visibility. forging ahead when opposed by all forces, yet yielding as water when you meet a stone. use originality, spontenaious, and surprizing elements as your hidden weapon.
    the other thing is, The facilities won’t be there on day one. On day one, you have zero facilities, and at the end of the year 10, so 5 on average. Adding up to 5x5x240= 6,000 that whole maths thing went over my head. my mom said i should have taken more maths, but ah well.
    thank you for your blog entry. i will tack it up on my wall as the other commenter said.

  59. Bixee Blog January 30, 2006 at 9:42 am - Reply

    Seed funding is pointless?

    Three engineers in India have an idea for an internet site, something so compelling that it must be visited by everyone Lets give it a name. say 2bRead.
    If they are any good, they will have a prototype running in 2 months. They w…

  60. How to Start a Two-Bit Operation January 30, 2006 at 10:16 am - Reply

    Learning the ‘art of bootstrapping’

    There’s a good article on ‘the art of bootstrapping’ a startup on Guy Kawasaki’s blog that hits right on with what we’re trying to do. The basic premise is that when it’s hard to get venture capital funding (for whatever reason) entrepreneurs need to ‘…

  61. Bill Lennan January 30, 2006 at 3:55 pm - Reply

    Hi Guy,
    great post 🙂
    Our founders bootstrapped for a year, trying to sell software.
    They switched to a service model after a couple of friends/beta users pointed out how well the product was working for something the founders had not originally considered.
    Since the switch to a service model, we have attracted VC, a couple hundred customers, and are usually well ahead of our sales goals.

  62. Cool Verification January 30, 2006 at 6:43 pm - Reply

    Defining “Ship Then Test” For Chip Design

    When a company like Intel builds a microprocessor they have the luxury of throwing massive engineering, marketing, and sales teams at the problem. The architecture and marketing teams will work with major customers to ensure the product being built will

  63. Thoughts From The CRM Coach January 31, 2006 at 4:58 pm - Reply

    Bootstrap Your Way Through A CRM Project

    Yesterday, Graham Hill posted an excellent idea in a newsgroup Ive been participating in.
    Graham argues that there is a fundamental flaw to focusing on ROI for a CRM project, arguing that it forces managers to concentrate on the future re…

  64. Stiennon January 31, 2006 at 8:17 pm - Reply

    I learned “3.) Ship then test” years ago when I was launching an engineering design firm. For Detroit we had a revolutionary concept. We were going to use degreed mechanical engineers to design automotive components. ( Even today that is not how it works. The engineers shuffle paperwork, draftsmen on CAD stations design the products. Before even investing in software and and workstations I went to a major automotive supplier and sold them on hiring us. We had a $25K Purchase order in hand before we spent a dollar!
    As far as I know Virtual Engineering is still in operation. www.veng.com

  65. Richard Clay February 2, 2006 at 7:57 pm - Reply

    Pills, battles and cash flow. Yep, that about covers it.

  66. christian jung beta February 11, 2006 at 9:31 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki has some tough statements on design

    So this is harsh: Guys advice to bootstrap a company: Ship, then test. Thats the most radical statement ive ever read when applied to interface design. And: Focus on function, not form. Hey, would Skype ever have made…

  67. MedBillAdvisor Blog February 12, 2006 at 1:38 pm - Reply

    Bootstrapping Advice (aka Get Off The Porch You Knucklehead)

    I found this article by Guy Kawasaki very helpful in adding perspective and focus to our efforts here, so I am reblogging the summary points here. If you want the full article (which I recommend) go here
    – christopher
    The Art of Bootstrapping [excerpt]…

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  69. Webwotch February 26, 2006 at 2:37 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki on the art of bootstrapping your business venture

    Guy Kawasaki – former Apple evangelist and author of The Art of the Start – has a list of 11 items up on his blog concerning what is important when starting your company with your own money. VC money seems to be more difficult to get than ever, and may…

  70. Anonymous March 5, 2006 at 9:20 pm - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping ( for entrepreneur )

    Someone once told me that the probability of an entrepreneur getting venture capital is the same as getting struck by lightning while standing at the bottom of a swimming pool on a sunny day.

  71. Carpe Diem May 11, 2006 at 3:11 am - Reply

    El arte de triunfar por uno mismo, por Guy Kawasaki

    Alguien me dijo una vez que la probabilidad de que un emprendedor consiga capital de riesgo es la misma que le caiga un rayo mientras está de pié en la zona profunda de una piscina en un día soleado. Y eso aún siendo optimista.

  72. Saeble May 17, 2006 at 4:11 am - Reply

    asbestos underpants on/
    hey asshole…
    for a start, I’ve blocked all 11 of the active java scripts/tickers/pageviewer miners on your blog…
    Secondly, your unvarnished lofty arrogance and wall street pulpit crap has stirred me to typing, which is a hard thing to do of late…
    I’ve met quite a few _____wads like you. Most of the time I’ll walk within the first few minutes of meeting them. I get very tired of the sanctimonious superior airs from people like you.
    I don’t particularly care whom, or how successful you may be.. that doesn’t stop really hoping you walk under a truck whilst in the middle of one of your diatribes.
    I only wish I hadn’t stumbled upon you geekmine/blog.
    the short version :
    sod off smart ass.
    /asbestos off

  73. BootStrapMe June 10, 2006 at 8:00 am - Reply

    Crucial bootstrapping principals reviewed

    Blogger Guy Kawasaki promotes bootstrapping as an alternative to big financial backing. He even suggests that too much financing when starting out could be a bad thing. Here are some crucial principals he recommends for those without the backing…

  74. BootStrapMe June 10, 2006 at 8:10 am - Reply

    Crucial bootstrapping principals reviewed

    Blogger Guy Kawasaki promotes bootstrapping as an alternative to big financial backing. He even suggests that too much financing when starting out could be a bad thing. Here are some crucial principals he recommends for those without the backing…

  75. BootStrapMe June 10, 2006 at 8:20 am - Reply

    Crucial bootstrapping principals reviewed

    Blogger Guy Kawasaki promotes bootstrapping as an alternative to big financial backing. He even suggests that too much financing when starting out could be a bad thing. Here are some crucial principals he recommends for those without the backing…

  76. Shawn A. Hessinger June 11, 2006 at 2:07 pm - Reply

    Guy,
    A great post which inspired not one but two of my own. I gave you you’re propers, of course. Thanks, again.

  77. BootStrapMe June 29, 2006 at 1:41 am - Reply

    Advice from bootstrapper examined

    I missed this gem of a post from Jeff Cornwall over at The Entrepreneurial Mind the first time around when he put it online in early March. Jeff relates the advice of successful bootstrapper Charles Hagood, co-founder of The…

  78. Mehmet Subasi July 13, 2006 at 6:44 am - Reply

    Good strategies not only to bootstrapers but to all companies.
    It is also true that Bootstrapping by nature doesn’t allow you to make many mistakes you could have made.
    I regard bootstrappers highly, they usually have a much complete vision on running a propper business compared to entrepreneurs of funded companies.

  79. Eric Patterson July 13, 2006 at 10:04 pm - Reply

    Great post. I do suggest for the other readers to read your book for more clarification on the points, as much of what they are arguing over is covered.
    The points on bootstrapping reminded me of hearing a couple of visiting VC’s speak in my entrepreneurial finance class. They told us “You don’t want our money if you can avoid taking it, because when you do we own you and your company.” Followed by a half joking analogy of taking VC money is like selling your soul to, maybe not quite the devil himself, but atleast a bunch of demons. This, in combination with your other post on the top ten lies of VC’s, where you talk about greed being a significant driver of the VC game, reiterates how bootstrapping may not be just a necessary evil to the budding, or experienced entrepreneur for that matter, but it may be literally the most rewarding experience of his or her life. Google, although not the common startup, is a great example to look at because Larry & Sergi avoided diluting themselves very well.

  80. BootStrapMe July 16, 2006 at 5:41 pm - Reply

    Bootstrap for retirement

    An article by Barabara Weltman in Bottom Line/Retirement suggests some guidelines for bootstrapping a business for less than $1,000 to see you through your retirement years. Im not quite there yet, but the piece makes some good points about…

  81. James Semple July 21, 2006 at 12:14 pm - Reply

    I love this article, it explains me perfectly. I worked for a large Fortune 500, got tired of trying to get ideas to fly with the big shots. So I left. I went and traveled the world for 4 months, love travel so much I started Boomtrek.com (shameless plug) and I hired 4 people (top down approach) instead of bottoms-up (at the pub after making some money haha) I ran out of money so fast it wasn’t even funny… people thought I gave up, so they lost enthusiasm. Well, I wasn’t done… I am stubborn (more professionally… determined) to get this sucker to fly. Version 2 is out and working on R3 which will have the ability to download travel places/points to your Pocket PC (e-mail me to get on the beta-list of this free software for your PDA)
    Anyways back to my story, I’m $25,000 in debt + $10,000 in credit cards, completely maxed out… collectors calling me, it is so horrible you almost want to cry. I hate being in debt, it sucks so bad!! So I bootstrap, I’ve been on a wicked contract for the past 4 months now, doing my stuff in between. I’ve paid off my credit cards completely, cut them in half (boy did that feel great! you should try it sometime)
    My personal mottos and lessons for other entrepreneurs:
    – be stubborn (determined)
    – 3-foot rule (goto friends/family for bootstrapping jobs)
    – selling a service (yourself/consulting) is instantaneous but you’ll work forever, if you’re selling a product… it takes 10x longer… not for the weak
    – someone told me “do what you love, the money will follow” best advice ever! dont listen to the noise around you, listen to your heart
    – networking meetings for entrepreneurs are no good, you meet people exactly like you and not the “right” people, talk to the speakers with a successful business… they’ll also tell you “I remember when I had maxed out credit cards” now I know.

  82. Shabayek July 27, 2006 at 5:16 am - Reply

    Sorry for such a tad posting… but this sentence is a bit misleading:
    “” could build a case that too much money is worse too little “”
    I think you mean Worth, not worse, correct?

  83. BootStrapMe July 31, 2006 at 3:01 pm - Reply

    Bootstrapper solves printer problems (Part 6)

    CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST A steady cash flow remains crucial to the bootstrapping method since bootstrapping entrepreneurs use cash flow to grow their business instead of outside investment. As blogger and entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki observes: Cash i…

  84. BootStrapMe July 31, 2006 at 9:20 pm - Reply

    Bootstrapper solves printer problems (Part 6)

    CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST A steady cash flow remains crucial to the bootstrapping method since bootstrapping entrepreneurs use cash flow to grow their business instead of outside investment. As blogger and entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki observes: Cash i…

  85. BootStrapMe July 31, 2006 at 9:30 pm - Reply

    Bootstrapper solves printer problems (Part 6)

    CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST A steady cash flow remains crucial to the bootstrapping method since bootstrapping entrepreneurs use cash flow to grow their business instead of outside investment. As blogger and entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki observes: Cash i…

  86. Marcin Brzezinski August 2, 2006 at 12:56 am - Reply

    Hi Guy,
    I don’t quite agree with point number 10 – if you’re a small bootstrapped organisation acting in a niche market you don’t really have the power of “big competitor” (with known flaws) behind you to position against.
    And if you’re young you can expect few percent of your leads to turn to your competitor you position against for the sake of dealing with an “established organisation”.
    Also, I cannot stress enough how points 1&11 are important, as long as the cash flows – everything else can be sorted out and optimised.

  87. Happenings of the UnderEmployed by Kevin McDonald August 4, 2006 at 5:20 pm - Reply

    Cash is King

    As I start to eliminate options and ideas and zero in on my next gig I find myself looking for inspiration on entrepreneurial websites. Guy Kawasaki has been a long time favorite to YEO’rs but I’d never paid too much…

  88. dodo August 9, 2006 at 7:05 am - Reply

    白手起家的艺术 Guy Kawasaki

    白手起家的艺术 Guy Kawasaki
    原文作者:Guy Kawasaki
    译者:拙尘
    原文链接:The Art of Bootstrapping
    有人曾经对我说,一个创业者得到风险投资的几率如同在一个晴天下站在游泳池里被闪电击中一样。这种比喻仍然是过于乐观了。…

  89. BootStrapMe August 20, 2006 at 10:53 pm - Reply

    VC gives bootstrapping advice (Part 2)

    CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST However, in notes prepared for Marcus Gibson, co-author of Bootstrapping Your Business: Start And Grow a Successful Company With Almost No Money, written with RightNow Technologies CEO and founder Greg Gianforte, Feld advi…

  90. Daniel Varela August 23, 2006 at 8:22 am - Reply

    When to Stop Bootstrapping It
    please comment this
    http://www.inc.com/resources/inc500/2006/articles/20060801/fitzgerald.html

  91. blissity lounge September 2, 2006 at 10:12 am - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    Guy Kawasaki writes a nice post about the Art of Bootstrapping: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2006/01/the_art_of_boot.html
    I think with todays availability of open source technology, cheap hosting and great design there is a much better chance to …

  92. Ranjeet Sodhi September 6, 2006 at 1:30 pm - Reply

    wow… I killed my business idea 3 years ago when I failed to raise capital; bootstrapping was considered but not given due consideration.
    Guess its time to get back to the drawing board, but this time armed with these really insightful suggestions.
    PS: Great blog…

  93. Social startups September 8, 2006 at 12:39 pm - Reply

    Starting up the start-up discussion

    I’m not sure I’m the best person to write about how to start a company. On the one hand, I know in my bones when someone is going to do whatever it takes to win as an entrepreneur and when

  94. BootStrapMe September 24, 2006 at 5:38 am - Reply

    Quebec entrepreneur lists bootstrapping tips to remember (Part 1)

    Some time ago Montreal, Quebec-based entrepreneur Ben Yoskovitz split his IGotNewsForYou blog in two making a split personality just another of Bens problems. Ben was one of the earliest commentors on my blog and one of these days were…

  95. BootStrapMe September 24, 2006 at 11:18 pm - Reply

    What the heck is this bootstrapping all about anyway?

    Glad you asked. After several months of editing this blog, it occurs to me we could use a fresh explanation of what were doing here and why. Simply put, bootstrapping is any one of various processes in which simple…

  96. BootStrapMe September 25, 2006 at 11:49 pm - Reply

    VC post argues for bootstrapping (Part 2)

    And here are a few more from Rob Finns post 75 Blog Posts to Read Before Talking to a VC. Meant as a primer on what VCs look for, these links could be seen as an argument for bootstrapping….

  97. BootStrapMe September 27, 2006 at 4:12 pm - Reply

    Bootstrap for retirement

    An article by Barabara Weltman in Bottom Line/Retirement suggests some guidelines for bootstrapping a business for less than $1,000 to see you through your retirement years. Im not quite there yet, but the piece makes some good points about…

  98. BootStrapMe September 27, 2006 at 4:13 pm - Reply

    Bootstrap for retirement

    An article by Barabara Weltman in Bottom Line/Retirement suggests some guidelines for bootstrapping a business for less than $1,000 to see you through your retirement years. Im not quite there yet, but the piece makes some good points about…

  99. BootStrapMe September 28, 2006 at 1:39 am - Reply

    Bootstrapper solves printer problems (Part 6)

    CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST A steady cash flow remains crucial to the bootstrapping method since bootstrapping entrepreneurs use cash flow to grow their business instead of outside investment. As blogger and entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki observes: Cash i…

  100. Yuri October 10, 2006 at 4:27 am - Reply

    That’s an interesting idea that a) God exists b) she is a woman. Proof?

  101. Mercer On Value October 25, 2006 at 9:41 am - Reply

    Top Ten Reasons Not to Hold Lots of Cash on your Balance Sheet

    Mark Hulbert’s piece in the Sunday New York Times discussed a recent academic paper entitled Why Do U.S.Firms Hold So Much More Cash Than They Used To?  I’ll write about this study later, but the title and Hulbert’s short discussion…

  102. Mercer On Value October 25, 2006 at 11:43 am - Reply

    Top Ten Reasons Not to Hold Lots of Cash on Your Balance Sheet

    Mark Hulbert’s piece in the Sunday New York Times discussed a recent academic paper entitled Why Do U.S.Firms Hold So Much More Cash Than They Used To?  I’ll write about this study later, but the title and Hulbert’s short discussion…

  103. Brendan December 9, 2006 at 6:44 am - Reply

    Ship then test – I note that there are two arguments here. Shipping before testing can get cashflow going, but it can lead to a loss of reputation, which can lead to cashflow stopping. Really, it comes down to “Know your customer”. I am involved in two companies, one which follows the ship then test philosophy to a certain degree, because the customers are used to that sort of approach. The second company is in an industry this is used to turnkey solutions, and “ship then test” would be disaster. In this case, we talked to the target customers and key industry bodies prior to beginning development.

  104. Technofile Europe December 13, 2006 at 8:20 am - Reply

    79 blog posts to read before raising capital

    Someone has compiled this useful wiki of blog posts for entrepreneurs thinking about raising capital. A lot of the topics I discussed here in the past are covered, including Board composition, bootstrapping, how to think about equity dilution, etc. My

  105. Tim Patton December 29, 2006 at 12:21 pm - Reply

    Looking for a coach/mentor.
    Still looking for a mentor/coach/someone to help me continue growing in the future!!!
    Here are a few questions I would have for the person I will be working with;
    • What steps do I need to take to start a business of my own?
    • How do I find and hire the correct employees for the business?
    • How do I contact someone else like Harv to get his products at wholesale value and then sell them at my seminar?
    • How do I get the correct sound equipment, microphones, and sound speakers for the event/seminar?
    • How do I find my target market?
    • How do I find the correct people who want to attend my energy training seminars?
    • What advertising steps do I need to go through to get people to come to the Energy Trainings/Evenings?
    • How do I put on a tele-seminar?
    o Got Alex Mandosians course and that isn’t helping me.
    • How do I find the correct places to put on the tele-seminar?
    • How would I go about putting employees on a payroll?
    • How would I attain money to pay these employees?
    • How would I go about finding other speakers to come to my seminars?
    • How would I go about putting together and forming a core team to assist me?
    • How would I go about setting up the hotel where the event will be taking place?
    • How do I make sure I have people to fill the hotel rooms I have booked?
    o I don’t want to be charged money b/c I couldn’t get anyone to show up.
    • How do I get a good website started?
    o Should I use a website yet?
    o What all should be included on the site?
    o What company should I use?
    o How would I go about attracting people to the site?
    • What forms of advertising should I use?
    • Do I want to use media/TV?
    • When do I want to create my own audio products?
    o How would I go about creating these audio products?
    • How would I develop my own courses and decide what goes on at the courses?
    o I have to get my participants in the funnel.
    • How would I go about writing notes for the presentation and how it’s going to take place?
    o I have a presentation template, what could, and has been said, although I haven’t memorized it.
    o Would I want to memorize it or how would/could I do it spontaneously?
    • I want to be the promoter of a motivational/inspirational/educational seminar.
    o How would I go about putting everything in place for that?
    • How do I form my seminars so I can teach in all three ways; auditory, visual, and kinesthetic?
    o What all needs to be included (props)?
    o How should I speak?
    o How should I move?
    o What are all the signs when I should be aware that I am losing my audience?
    • What do I need to do to start a small passive income coming in and growing each and everyday?
    • How would I go about staying in touch with my participants?
    • How would I attain my target markets e mail name, number, fax, and address?
    • How would I go about putting together a business plan?
    These are all questions I thought of while I was on vacation in Chicago for Christmas 2006. On the way home from Chicago my father was talking to me about the business and when I am going to start bringing in some income. He recommended getting started working a J.O.B. with someone in your own field. That may be YOU!!! If you do work in some type of motivational, inspirational, or energy healing, transformation business please respond back ASAP so we can talk more about how we’re going to help each other grow. Thank you for taking the time to read this post.
    Timothy Patton
    energytomoney@yahoo.com

  106. young January 1, 2007 at 3:56 pm - Reply

    Brilliant post, good advice for those embarking on a startup, it really should be required reading for all!
    young

  107. Anonymous January 2, 2007 at 2:21 pm - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping

    Let’s say that you can’t raise money for whatever reason: You’re not a “proven”

  108. Lal January 8, 2007 at 8:13 am - Reply

    I believe there is BIG cultural divide between the USA and Europe (it may apply to other areas but thats my ‘knowledge base’).
    Startups in the US are more likely (IMHO) 2b more adventurous and just go and do it (after having read your ‘words of wisdom’ etc..) whereas in Ireland/UK the stars have 2b aligned and a blue moon showing … u get the idea.
    Lack of support is also a big issue unless u have the balls 2 go 4 it (like Carson http://www.carsonified.com/about/).
    Failures (and the experience that brings) across the waters are not seen as ‘extra credits’ for your next gig. Some of that appears 2b slooooowly changing (but only in the myopic startup arena).
    Lal
    PS I enjoyed Guy’s “The Art of the Start” seminar in Denver and his personality has a large part 2 play in the game (as u can c from his blog).

  109. Rob Vaughn Consulting March 13, 2007 at 3:43 pm - Reply

    The Art of Bootstrapping a Startup: One Mistake

    Guy Kawasaki is one of those guys who survived the Dot-Bomb Crash with his reputation mostly intact, and he’s managed to rebuilt what little damage it took and has added onto it. And he’s willing to share his experience via…

  110. mehna May 15, 2007 at 4:22 am - Reply

    Yours was an interesting read….Sramana Mitra in her piece, http://sramanamitra.com/blog/655″>Is Bootstrapping Becoming Sexy Again? has explored the phenomenon that today, companies can be built quickly bootstrapping and bring success. Entrepreneurs are perfectly happy bootstrapping their companies.

  111. FiberGeneration June 1, 2007 at 9:36 am - Reply

    Kazados.tv : still not online

    Folks at 2T Productions and VO-Productions might be busy those days. Kazados.tv is still not online, altough it was planned to go on air (hey, that’s Television 😉 at the beginning of this week.Having problems with PHP/MySQL over Flash, guys

  112. imakesmoney.com June 7, 2007 at 9:22 pm - Reply

    the art of bootstrapping

    I came across one of Guy Kawasakis old blog post the art of bootstrapping which I found to be very insightful.  I wonder how he has applied this art to his own startup truemors.com.

  113. dhamodharan June 10, 2007 at 9:21 pm - Reply

    Yes, The comments on the Bootstrapping reflects the same.

  114. Florian Waigand July 9, 2007 at 8:22 am - Reply

    Take the “red Pill” 🙂 This point is so hardly true. We are working everyday close to financial death but dying is no choice when u got a vision you trust in. There is allways a way to make money and to cut down the monthley bills. Everyone i our team still has his job as an employee in other firms so we dont need to pay them. Its hard but we are shure it will pay out later.

  115. BootStrapMe July 16, 2007 at 10:44 pm - Reply

    Follow our bootstrap endeavor

    So, to recap, Hessinger Media is the first step in a bootstrap endeavor, one Im hoping will evolve into a unique combination of eclectic content blogging, interactive user posting, personal media and online community with maybe a couple other…

  116. Mike July 17, 2007 at 4:03 am - Reply

    We went for venture financing and got turned down, now we have to bootstrap by being a service provider. Frankly I’m overjoyed.

  117. Bootstrap business July 28, 2007 at 2:24 am - Reply

    The first statement is undeniably true. Most successful entrepreneurs focus on “circulating” their money thru the cycle of investment and sales, rather than focusing on the profit they’ll get. This is really a good post.

  118. Innovators Network August 28, 2007 at 12:47 pm - Reply

    US Supreme Court to Patent Trolls: The Gig’s Up!

    Scott Feldman, a partner in the Irvine, CA, office of the law firm Crowell and Moring, takes a look at some recent patent case rulings by the Supreme Court of the US that are changing how businesses protect their intellectual

  119. Anthony Kuhn August 28, 2007 at 12:57 pm - Reply

    Guy:
    This post is exactly what I look for in information and knowledge that the target audience of my blog would like to read. I liked Number 11 on your list of bootstrapper keys to success (“Take the Red Pill”) so much that I cross-linked to your post, along with some comments, at http://blog.innovators-network.org which is a non-profit dedicated to bringing technology to small businesses, intellectual property experts, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists. Please visit us and help grow our community!
    Best wishes for every future success.
    Anthony Kuhn
    Innovators Network

  120. mitesh September 7, 2007 at 4:56 am - Reply

    After reading your post every one would like to read your book. Its intresting
    Nice post

  121. Mitesh Rami September 7, 2007 at 5:01 am - Reply

    A great post which inspired not just me but also one of my friend. After reading your post i felt like he just got an idea of winning the business

  122. Brian October 2, 2007 at 11:31 am - Reply

    All Hail the bootstrapped business, welcome to the world of high tech business 🙂

  123. Instigator Blog October 21, 2007 at 8:14 pm - Reply

    An Introductory Guide to Startup Funding

    Getting a startup funded isnt easy. Theres no shortage of hype, and multiple announcements daily of new companies getting money. And theres an equal (and growing) amount of chatter about a new bubble that were…

  124. 6 ways to save money while bootstrapping your business February 22, 2015 at 8:31 pm - Reply

    […] “The Art of Bootstrapping,” by Guy Kawasaki < key point here, “If you know you are going to bootstrap, you should start a business with a small up-front capital requirement, short sales cycles, short payment terms, and recurring revenue. It means passing up the big sale that take twelve months to close, deliver, and collect.” […]

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