The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

I suffer from something called Ménière’s disease—don’t worry, you cannot get it from reading my blog. The symptoms of Ménière’s include hearing loss, tinnitus (a constant ringing sound), and vertigo. There are many medical theories about its cause: too much salt, caffeine, or alcohol in one’s diet, too much stress, and allergies. Thus, I’ve worked to limit control all these factors.

However, I have another theory. As a venture capitalist, I have to listen to hundreds of entrepreneurs pitch their companies. Most of these pitches are crap: sixty slides about a “patent pending,” “first mover advantage,” “all we have to do is get 1% of the people in China to buy our product” startup. These pitches are so lousy that I’m losing my hearing, there’s a constant ringing in my ear, and every once in while the world starts spinning.

To prevent an epidemic of Ménière’s in the venture capital community, I am evangelizing the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points. While I’m in the venture capital business, this rule is applicable for any presentation to reach agreement: for example, raising capital, making a sale, forming a partnership, etc.

  • Ten slides. Ten is the optimal number of slides in a PowerPoint presentation because a normal human being cannot comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting—and venture capitalists are very normal. (The only difference between you and venture capitalist is that he is getting paid to gamble with someone else’s money). If you must use more than ten slides to explain your business, you probably don’t have a business. The ten topics that a venture capitalist cares about are:

    1. Problem
    2. Your solution
    3. Business model
    4. Underlying magic/technology
    5. Marketing and sales
    6. Competition
    7. Team
    8. Projections and milestones
    9. Status and timeline
    10. Summary and call to action
  • Twenty minutes. You should give your ten slides in twenty minutes. Sure, you have an hour time slot, but you’re using a Windows laptop, so it will take forty minutes to make it work with the projector. Even if setup goes perfectly, people will arrive late and have to leave early. In a perfect world, you give your pitch in twenty minutes, and you have forty minutes left for discussion.

  • Thirty-point font. The majority of the presentations that I see have text in a ten point font. As much text as possible is jammed into the slide, and then the presenter reads it. However, as soon as the audience figures out that you’re reading the text, it reads ahead of you because it can read faster than you can speak. The result is that you and the audience are out of synch.

    The reason people use a small font is twofold: first, that they don’t know their material well enough; second, they think that more text is more convincing. Total bozosity. Force yourself to use no font smaller than thirty points. I guarantee it will make your presentations better because it requires you to find the most salient points and to know how to explain them well. If “thirty points,” is too dogmatic, the I offer you an algorithm: find out the age of the oldest person in your audience and divide it by two. That’s your optimal font size.

So please observe the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. If nothing else, the next time someone in your audience complains of hearing loss, ringing, or vertigo, you’ll know what caused the problem. One last thing: to learn more about the zen of great presentations, check out a site called Presentation Zen by my buddy Garr Reynolds.

By | 2016-10-24T14:29:49+00:00 December 30th, 2005|Categories: Entrepreneurship, Marketing and Sales, Pitching and Presenting, Venture Capital|Tags: |253 Comments

About the Author:

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. Formerly, he was an advisor to the Motorola business unit of Google and chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of Social Media, The Art of the Start, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

253 Comments

  1. Thomas Lee January 1, 2006 at 10:51 am - Reply

    Ahh the 10/20/30 rule.
    I remember this when you gave your speech at the NYLF Tech forum this year. I found this part to be very useful.

  2. Michael Mark January 1, 2006 at 1:29 pm - Reply

    This regime makes presentations better. Thanks. Still, ppt is a monologue at core – unable to adjust to a welcome, hopefully, new idea-detour that could arise between slide 4 and 5 making 6,7…obsolete.

  3. Christine January 1, 2006 at 2:54 pm - Reply

    It’s your. Not you’re.
    “That’s you’re optimal font size.”

    • kashew April 17, 2015 at 4:07 pm - Reply

      there’s always one

  4. Randy Holloway Unfiltered 2.0 January 1, 2006 at 3:05 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki is blogging

    Guy Kawasaki: As a venture capitalist, I have to listen to hundreds of entrepreneurs pitch their companies. Most of these pitches are crap: sixty slides about a “patent pending,” “first mover advantage,” “all we have to do is get 1% of…

  5. evilzenscientist :: thoughts January 1, 2006 at 3:46 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki blogging

    Guy Kawasaki (author of such titles as Selling the Dream – another must read book) has a new blog.
    One of his first posts really rings true – about the use (and abuse) of PowerPoint.
    I am trying to evangelize the 10/20/30 Rule of Powe…

  6. Kip Meacham January 1, 2006 at 4:40 pm - Reply

    Welcome to the tactfully tactless world of blogging! (Per the ‘you’re/your’ comment above…)
    Since it’s Sunday, some Sunday School words come to mind about making “a man an offender for a word.” (KJV, Isaiah 29:11, 12)
    Gimme a break. Blogging is best when it is organic, fluid, and spontaneous. This is part of the potency of it all. If Christine can’t handle a typo or grammatical faux pas, she should read something other than your (or is it ‘you’re?’) blog (or anyone else’s for that matter). Did you get anything else out of the post, Christine?
    Forgive the in-your-face comment about the comment, but what a poster child case-in-point for blogging arrogance your comment is.
    Great post, Guy. It made me think about my posts. That’s something cool to take away from your blog.
    I look forward to reading more. Keep it up!

  7. Kam VedBrat January 1, 2006 at 5:21 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki on PowerPoint

    Guy Kawasaki makes some interesting comments on PowerPoint presentations he sees on a regular basis….

  8. Rob Hyndman January 1, 2006 at 6:59 pm - Reply

    Guy,
    SERC worked for my Menieres – it doesn’t help with the tinnitus and doesn’t stop the hearing loss, but has stopped all problems with vertigo. Worked immediately for me.
    Cheers,
    Rob

  9. AlfredTwo January 1, 2006 at 8:18 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    So it appears that Guy Kawasaki(please don’t tell me you don’t know who he is or Ishall be…

  10. Tripp Parks's WebLog January 1, 2006 at 11:45 pm - Reply

    The rules of PowerPoint

    Guy Kawasaki has some excellent pointers on how to use PowerPoint effectively.

  11. Gabor Cselle January 2, 2006 at 1:34 am - Reply

    Very good post. I agree that PP presentations should be made as painless as possible. Fabrice Grinda’s “Fund Raising 101” (http://www.fabricegrinda.com/?p=27) pretty much deals with the same topic, but suggests even fewer slides.
    Edward Tufte also has some general presentation tips: A summary can be found at: http://www.cgl.uwaterloo.ca/~csk/presentations.html
    What’s your take on these?

  12. Ondas, cables, luces, cacharritos y cachivaches January 2, 2006 at 3:50 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki: La regla 10/20/30

    Guy Kawasaki no es alguien que ‘suene’ mucho a la gente, sobre todo una vez despejado el hecho de que no tiene nada que ver con motos japonesas. Guy es uno de los primeros empleados de Apple, uno de los primeros “evangelistas” de la industria i…

  13. Florian January 2, 2006 at 4:08 am - Reply

    I used to be of the same opinion, but then I saw this presentation video by Dick Hardt:
    http://www.identity20.com/media/OSCON2005/

  14. Net January 2, 2006 at 4:25 am - Reply

    The Art of the Start

    I recently finnished reading Guy Kawasaki’s “The Art of the Start”, a book full of good advices for any entrepreneur. I especially liked the chapter called “The Art of Being a Mensch”. Too seldom I encounter any referrences to being

  15. Net January 2, 2006 at 4:27 am - Reply

    The Art of the Start

    I recently finished reading Guy Kawasaki’s “The Art of the Start”, a book full of good advices for any entrepreneur. I especially liked the chapter called “The Art of Being a Mensch”. Too seldom I encounter any references to being

  16. Die Stimme der freien Welt January 2, 2006 at 4:35 am - Reply

    I completely agree on you, especially about the font size. I always use at least 30 points.
    And I more and more tend to use slides with only two or three words on it. It’s only a guideline.
    Watch the presentations of Steve Jobs and learn. Leaner is better!
    And: Welcome to the blogging community, Guy! I really appreciate this.

  17. Tim Windsor January 2, 2006 at 6:12 am - Reply

    Guy,
    First, welcome. I always tell people that you’re the proto-blogger, from back in the days of the EvangeList. So, let Winer take credit as being the first blogger, you’re the first I read regularly (Dave was second…). Good to have you here as an actual blogger.
    10/20/30. Love it. Simple, memorable and it makes sense!
    I’ll be using it and sharing it.

  18. mikko puhakka January 2, 2006 at 7:48 am - Reply

    Guy, great to have you in blogging space. I have been involved in venture capital for 10+ years and agree totally with your post. Why do entrepreneurs try to educate e.g. VC specialized in mobile industry with market data rather than explain some insights which have enabled them to set up a business with true competitive advantage.
    mikko

  19. Get Real January 2, 2006 at 7:59 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki on the10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    I found that Kawasaki’s brand new blog is already helpful, in a backhanded way. I have been working with a number of startups in the past decade, and I continuously struggle with founders about their powerpoint addictions: too many bullets,…

  20. vowe dot net January 2, 2006 at 8:55 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    I am trying to evangelize the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points. As a special service to Lotus Marketing: I…

  21. Ronny Max January 2, 2006 at 10:00 am - Reply

    Great post. Point is – people have short attention span. They want information quickly, without the hassles of noise (too much data) or errors (not enough knowledge).
    I have my 100/10/1 rule: 100 pages detailed plan (in writing), 10 minutes talk (PowerPoint), and 1 sentence elevator’s pitch (the gist of the idea). The detailed plan forces understanding. The presentation presents the highlights. And the Elevator’s Pitch generates interest. I found that I failed when I didn’t use the 100/10/1 rule, and I succeeded when I did. Try it out. It works.

  22. Jenaro Martinez January 2, 2006 at 11:22 am - Reply

    I also saw the identity 2.0 presentation after an email from Guy’s mailing list, and based on that idea, I did a presentation at work. It went wonderful and has caused a great deal of impact. I found that one of the best things is that people have no other choice than to pay attention to the presenter, instead of reading ahead of the presentation.

  23. Get Real January 2, 2006 at 12:17 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki on the10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    I found that Kawasaki’s brand new blog is already helpful, in a backhanded way. I have been working with a number of startups in the past decade, and I continuously struggle with founders about their powerpoint addictions: too many bullets,…

  24. John C. Randolph January 2, 2006 at 12:18 pm - Reply

    What not to do in a presentation:
    http://static.flickr.com/28/58697220_0f5db5fe00.jpg
    If you have a slide that looks like that, you suck. That’s all there is to it.
    I also recommend using Keynote. It came along just in time to save my life, because if I’d had to do one more WWDC talk with PowerPoint, I’d have shot myself.
    -jcr

  25. Kedar January 2, 2006 at 1:10 pm - Reply

    Gr8 post!
    Where would u include finance in those slides. I tried to contain my presentation in 10 slides but that is one more slide i have to put in. Last discussion I had with some angel investors, whole meeting turned in discussion rather than power pt controlling the flow.

  26. Stefan Tilkov's Random Stuff January 2, 2006 at 1:13 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    From The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint: Its quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points. [] Sure, you have an hour time slot, but you&#8217…

  27. John Pescatore January 2, 2006 at 2:09 pm - Reply

    Guy, do me a favor: as someone who has to listen to a lot of VC-funded startups give their pitches *after* they’ve gotten your money, I beg you to force all your funded startups to observe the 10 .ppt rule.
    I’ll give them 30 minutes and don’t care about type size, but the majority of funded companies seem to think 28 slides and 60 minutes is what they need to convince me that they are patent pending, holistic, proactive and will sell to 90% of the Fortune 5000 – let alone China.
    So, if you make those who want you money stick to a renamed elevator pitch rule, please do so with your funded companies as well.
    Regards, John P.

  28. Stiennon January 2, 2006 at 2:23 pm - Reply

    So yes, great advice. I have been attemptinng to follow it for years.
    So how come every funding source says “nice presentation, send us your business plan” and then they expect a 90 page bplan that itemizes everything down to postage and is projected quarterly over 5 years. C’mon guys. Anything over 8 months is a guess. can’t you multiply by 2 for each year just like the poor entrepreneur that puts those numbers together?

  29. Robert Padbury January 2, 2006 at 10:16 pm - Reply

    Although I’ve only seen a few pitch presentations, I would say that instead of making the rule 10 slides, make it 10 concepts, because sometimes you may want to have say 3 or 4 slides to convey a concept.
    That and I’ve always been a huge fan of the Steve Jobs keynotes. 🙂 Great Article. There are far to many bad presentations out there.

  30. keeping simple January 2, 2006 at 11:45 pm - Reply

    Power Point and Rocket Science and the dangers of compelling stories

    Edward Tufte dislikes PowerPoint and explains why in an article about the contribution of PowerPoint to the Columbia disaster.
    My other models for NASA are Feynmans lectures on physics, and the A3 page (or 11 by 17 in) folded in half. You can…

  31. TomorrowConnecting.biz January 3, 2006 at 1:19 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 PowerPoint Rule

    Guy Kawasaki has posted some great guidelines for delivering effective PowerPoint presentations at his blog (see it here). He calls his theory the 10/20/30 Rule. It goes something like this:
    No presentation should be bigger than 10 slides, last lon…

  32. Oliver Thylmann - Thoughts January 3, 2006 at 1:21 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    My fellow Corante Web Hub member Stowe Boyd posted about the 10/20/30 rules of Powerpoint, which originally comes from Guy Kawasaki. Stowe actually extends Guys idea with a 1/10/20/30 notion, meaning that each slide should make one part of your

  33. lifehack.org January 3, 2006 at 5:25 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    Presentation Guru Guy Kawasaki introduces a rule called 10/20/30 PowerPoint rule in one of his recent blog posts. What is it? He describes, a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font …

  34. Andreas Berg January 3, 2006 at 8:15 am - Reply

    So the next time I’ll present my business modell to VCs I’ll try to follow your rule. We’ll see if it’s convincing…

  35. Jeremy Smith's blog January 3, 2006 at 11:28 am - Reply

    10/20/30 Rule of Presentations

    The 10/20/30 Rule of Presentations…

  36. Rick January 3, 2006 at 3:04 pm - Reply

    Let’s keep in mind folks, following these rules will just make your presentation better, it won’t make your business model not suck.
    Also, a big fat no-prize to the person who can use “bozosity” the most in a coherent blog post. 😉

  37. Tom January 3, 2006 at 3:09 pm - Reply

    You’ve been dugg!
    http://www.digg.com/links/Making_great_PowerPoint_presentations_-_the_10_20_30_rule

  38. Otto R. Radke January 3, 2006 at 3:16 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

  39. Rob January 3, 2006 at 3:23 pm - Reply

    I also remember this from your NYLF presentation, I remember our Tech Talk group discussing how great your presentation had been. Nice to see you getting into the blogging world : )

  40. Blunt ID Blog - Pithy Commentary January 3, 2006 at 4:41 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of presentations

    Guy Kawasaki has a post on his blog about the 10/20/30 (10 slides/20 minutes/30 words) rule of good PowerPoint presentations. (Not the first time hes done this particular pitch but then again, Martin Luther King Jr. did a whole bunch of…

  41. DocSiteDoc January 3, 2006 at 5:16 pm - Reply

    presumably you do have Meniere’s & not benign vertigo (sounds like it). I suspect you would have looked extensively. The reason I ask, is the tx of BPV with mechanical maneuvers to move the “ear rocks” — see links. (info barter – you re: powerpoint; me re: tim hain, md website):
    Menieres – http://www.tchain.com/otoneurology/disorders/menieres/menieres.html
    BPPV –
    http://www.tchain.com/otoneurology/disorders/bppv/bppv.html

  42. Hermes January 3, 2006 at 5:19 pm - Reply

    links for 2006-01-04

    Resume of the guy who watched Tsunami (tags: Dogs Brooklyn Friends) Memorable Quotes from “Six Feet Under” (2001) (tags: tv Film) “Let the Good Times Roll” by Guy Kawasaki: The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint (tags: Design gtd leadership Speaking…

  43. Carlos S Del Castillo January 3, 2006 at 5:23 pm - Reply

    I was just wondering what you were up to these days!.
    Thanks for the post, I will definitely use it.

  44. YALD - Patrick Grote's Notes January 3, 2006 at 5:30 pm - Reply

    How to make power point presentations easy and understandable

    An article making the rounds today discusses effective Power Point presentations for venture capitalists. It talks about a 10/20/30 rule of Power Point. It’s an interesting article and one I am sure works with venture capitalists, but I’ve found some t…

  45. Ash Haque January 3, 2006 at 7:22 pm - Reply

    Some very good points there 🙂

  46. Darren Lychowyd January 3, 2006 at 8:15 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 rule seems pretty rudimentary, why didn’t anyone come up with this before?
    It seems it could be very innovative so i’m definately willing to try [for the most part] to abide by those three simple rules and hopefully everything will turn out spectacularly.

  47. Nivi January 3, 2006 at 9:02 pm - Reply

    Guy, I would love to see a good example of a “call to action” for
    1) investors
    2) customers

  48. OpsanBlog January 3, 2006 at 9:24 pm - Reply

    10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint Presentations

  49. Junto Boyz January 3, 2006 at 11:25 pm - Reply

    BUNCH OF GREAT ADVICE ON ENTREPREURISM AND STARTING YOUR COMPANY

    Sifting through bookmarks again. This time I came across a bunch of great posts on entrepreneurism, hiring, and advice on fundraising. If you’re doing a startup now or thinking about building a new business and haven’t read some of these posts, check t…

  50. Alvaro Gregori, e-learning, formación on-line January 4, 2006 at 3:09 am - Reply

    La Regla del 10/20/30 del Powerpoint

    Via OtroBlogMas.
    Guy Kawasaky es un maestro absoluto de la presentación. En este post habla de las presentaciones Powerpoint para la captación de Capital Riesgo, pero me da que es perfectamente aplicable a las presentaciones que se usan en docenci…

  51. MasterViews Latest News January 4, 2006 at 5:31 am - Reply

    10-20-30 PowerPoint Rule: Guy Kawasaki Gets It!

    Guy Kawasaki, PowerPoint 10-20-30 rule it’s all over the blogosphere, and deservedly so, as Guy really nails down some of the long time obstacles and myths about effective presentation design and delivery. What Guy Kawasaki advocates is nothing more th…

  52. Canuckflack January 4, 2006 at 7:15 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki, powerpoints and the 10/20/30 Rule

    Guy Kawasaki, who has now launched a blog, has some good advice for anyone considering a powerpoint presentation: … I am trying to evangelize the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last n…

  53. Matthew January 4, 2006 at 10:25 am - Reply

    Good work. I have to prepare usually 2 to 3 slide shows a week. Granted, I am not a venture capitalist, but those rules are a big help.

  54. AdPulp January 4, 2006 at 2:20 pm - Reply

    10/20/30 Blues

    Guy Kawasaki wants you to clean up your Power Point mess. As a venture capitalist, I have to listen to hundreds of entrepreneurs pitch their companies. Most of these pitches are crap: sixty slides about a “patent pending,” “first mover…

  55. Exclusive Concepts' Internet Marketing Blog January 4, 2006 at 4:51 pm - Reply

    Weekly Round-Up December 30, updated Jan 2.

    If you’re like me, it takes about 3 weeks to comfortably settle into a new year so that I’m not writing 2005 on my checks…. It will soon debut “Wow House” a reality series to be broadcast online and that’s only the beginning of its original prog…

  56. Exclusive Concepts' Internet Marketing Blog January 4, 2006 at 4:52 pm - Reply

    Weekly Round-Up December 30, updated Jan 2.

    If you’re like me, it takes about 3 weeks to comfortably settle into a new year so that I’m not writing 2005 on my checks…. It will soon debut “Wow House” a reality series to be broadcast online and that’s only the beginning of its original prog…

  57. Gregg January 4, 2006 at 5:39 pm - Reply

    Happy to see you in the blog-o-sphere, as I have visited Rules for Revolutionaries more than once this past year and have been listening to ‘Art of the Start’ off and on.
    On 10-20-30, Good general rule to follow, but have seen some spectacular dissidents as of recent ~ http://www.identity20.com/media/OSCON2005/
    Cheers,
    Gregg

  58. LUX.ET.UMBRA January 4, 2006 at 9:14 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    I’m an entrepeneur racing after a dream of becoming a VC if I make it into the big leagues. And this was one of the most valuable resources that I ran across since this is exactly what I hate to…

  59. Influential Interactive Marketing January 5, 2006 at 4:12 pm - Reply

    6 Smart Agency Rules for Winning Presentations

    One of the best takeaways from the Ad-Tech conference a few weeks ago for me was a point Guy Kawasaki made in his very entertaining keynote presentation about his 10/20/30 rule for marketing revolutionaries on using powerpoint. 10 slides 20

  60. PR Works January 5, 2006 at 10:22 pm - Reply

    Saving us all from PowerPoint abuse

    Flying text, sound effects, animation and retina-burning colour combinations are included in PowerPoint presentations for one reason: because theyre there.
    In the interest of looking more professional, polished and creative, we&#8…

  61. Random Thoughts January 6, 2006 at 10:44 pm - Reply

    Flagged Articles #5

    Ok, so Im way late with this. Ill blame CES Anyhow, here is my list of some interesting articles for the week ending December 31, 2005: Hugh Macleod works his magic – David Sifry. Good and Bad Procrastinators – Paul…

  62. Paco January 6, 2006 at 11:32 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki sucks.

  63. ff - Work things out! January 7, 2006 at 4:35 am - Reply

    Presentation Hacks: How to improve Powerpoint Work

    Thought´s about presentation agendas.

  64. kpont.com January 7, 2006 at 7:11 am - Reply

    10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    Guy Kawasaki makes a good case for The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint.
    I am trying to evangelize the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font …

  65. Jim Neaves January 7, 2006 at 8:29 am - Reply

    I have been making slideshows since 1970, back when it took 4 hours to make the original art for a color slide. PowerPoint is very good, and fast, for making outstanding slide shows. I agree with Guy on his approach to slide shows. Business pitches are a little different than training programs, but there is much more to developing a presentation.
    Review this article I wrote regarding visual communication http://www.jrneaves.com/instructional_graphics.htm.
    The biggest abuse I have witnessed is the use of “stupid” text animation and spot animations that add no value to the visual communication (i.e. “the dancing rabbit”, “barking dog”, and so forth.
    The most important part of the presentation is the complete, expert knowledge of the subject matter by the presenter. Complete knowledge of the subject matter eliminates the need for “wordy” slides and reading the slide to the audiance from the slide, normally with your back turned to the audiance. Remember, the slide show is there to support the message and information transfer. It is NOT the message.
    PowerPoint is a tool. It does not relieve the presenter of being and integral part of the presentation and message transfer, regardless of whether it is a business presentation or a training program.

  66. Jim Neaves January 7, 2006 at 8:38 am - Reply

    Follow the url http://www.jrneaves.com/instructional_graphics.htm for the article. My post included a period at the end of the sentence which was included in the url. The article is worth a read.

  67. Ari Paparo Dot Com January 7, 2006 at 9:36 am - Reply

    10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    Entrepreneurship guru Guy Kawasaki riffs on the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. No more than 10 slides No more than 20…

  68. Lake Falconer January 7, 2006 at 12:00 pm - Reply

    Might I suggest 5/10/20/30. As before but use the same presentation NO MORE than 5 times. Keep it fresh!
    http://lake.blogs.com

    • Abyshek October 15, 2015 at 11:50 am - Reply

      like the idea of 5 😉

  69. BizImpresario January 10, 2006 at 10:58 pm - Reply

    PowerPoint – The 10/20/30 Rule

    Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint presentations

  70. James Clark January 10, 2006 at 11:04 pm - Reply

    In my experience the best presentations have hardly any text in them. I was once told a great presentation consists of three consistent parts: Hook, Point, Illustration and ends with Punch.
    So add to the 10/20/30 Rule and you’ve got a nice guideline to entertaining through quick and precise storytelling.

  71. charlie January 12, 2006 at 11:53 am - Reply

    unfortunatley, i have to give most of my presentations to non-native speakers of english. sometimes it seems that these folks need to actually read the slidesto understand what i am saying.
    that might not sound right, but i have constantly seen that the flashier and heavier the presentation, the more successful the result. and it never matters how good my story is, if i try the 10/20/30 i lose. if i try the 100/60/10 with a ton of graphics too, i win.
    really sucks.
    that’s why i prefer to be a writer.

  72. Sam January 12, 2006 at 12:04 pm - Reply

    Good tips. While for a somewhat different audience, and old (not necessarily computer-related), I find these helpful as well:
    “Giving a Talk,” Prof. Bruce Randall Donald at Dartmouth College: http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~brd/Teaching/Giving-a-talk/giving-a-talk.html
    Great stuff.

  73. Gordon January 12, 2006 at 8:32 pm - Reply

    10-20-30 I love it but what about the “people” who insist on printing out the powerpoint to read it and complain that they can’t follow it because there’s not enough in there? Are we all now supposed to create a complementary supporting document too? Maybe the problem is as Tufte says – powerpoint itself?
    thx.

  74. Alvaro Gregori, e-learning, formación on-line January 13, 2006 at 3:10 am - Reply

    Usando Powerpoint para saltar el gap experto – autor

    Cuando iniciamos el desarrollo de un contenido on-line siempre nos enfrentamos al mismo problema, el experto en el tema no suele saber nada de e-learning y nosotros sabemos aun menos sobre el tema del curso: el Gap Experto/Autor. El denostado Powerpoin…

  75. Jean-Luc Raymond January 15, 2006 at 7:29 am - Reply

    Pr

  76. Comme si tu veux January 16, 2006 at 12:30 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    via:Guy Kawasaki
    A PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.
    1. Problem
    2. Your solution
    3. Business model
    4. Underlying magic/technology
    5. Marketin…

  77. Lawrence Liu's Report from the Inside January 19, 2006 at 3:19 am - Reply

    Preparing for the SharePoint Community Advancement Initiative

    Note to self: Remember to read Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint before preparing…

  78. The Gavel January 19, 2006 at 7:34 pm - Reply

    Let the Good Times Roll by Guy Kawasaki: The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    Guy Kawasaki gives good advice in using the 10/20/30 Rule when using PowerPoint in a presentation.

  79. The Gavel January 19, 2006 at 7:36 pm - Reply

    How to use PowerPoint More Effectively Using the 10/20/30 Rule

    Guy Kawasaki gives good advice in using the 10/20/30 Rule when using PowerPoint in a presentation.

  80. richard January 22, 2006 at 6:40 am - Reply

    Userful, I hope have chance to show you my PPT in your rules.
    FOB business forum,A professional forum in China, if you have time, please have a look.
    http://bbs.fobshanghai.com

  81. Simon Thorneycroft and Jonathan Hodgson January 22, 2006 at 10:49 am - Reply

    Common icons for PowerPoint slides and presentation tips

    When preparing a slide desk for a presentation I often look at other Microsoft talks and sometimes borrow…

  82. Kelly Miller January 24, 2006 at 12:23 am - Reply

    http://www.nextstudent.com/get_advice/get_advice.asp
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  83. jgmitchell.com January 24, 2006 at 6:04 am - Reply

    Why have I gotten myself into

    I’m starting to believe I chose the most boring degree to persue ever, business management. If it wasn’t for Arthur Andersen screwing a bunch of companies up, there wouldn’t be much to talk about in class and my textbooks would…

  84. jgmitchell.com January 24, 2006 at 6:08 am - Reply

    What have I gotten myself into

    I’m starting to believe I chose the most boring degree to persue ever, business management. If it wasn’t for Arthur Andersen screwing a bunch of companies up, there wouldn’t be much to talk about in class and my textbooks would…

  85. OpsanBlog January 24, 2006 at 10:42 pm - Reply

    Improve your PowerPoint-ing

  86. Directory of Progressive American Blogs and News January 27, 2006 at 11:14 am - Reply

    Diet Pills Archives – Diet Blog

    The Progressive Blog Alliance HQ. The Central Node of the PBA … Submitted by diet pills…

  87. Sale January 29, 2006 at 10:48 am - Reply

    I have been reading your blog – I wonder how you’ll keep up this amazing flow of brilliant content. That is awesome!

  88. Sale January 30, 2006 at 3:15 pm - Reply

    We would be honored if we could be added to this great blog. We are from http://www.worldbusinessforsale.com/

  89. Page February 3, 2006 at 4:04 am - Reply

    Lots of useful comments and links!
    We are from;
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  90. Christopher Salazar February 13, 2006 at 1:25 am - Reply

    This is very useful information for everyone! Thank you for sharing this. I also got a chance to hear this from Guy first hand from his presentation at San Jose State University.
    In addition, I took notes on his presentation and posted them here on my blog: http://e-bizz.blogspot.com/2006/02/10-steps-of-entrepreneurship-guy.html
    Thanks again Guy for all of your incite and great advice!
    Christopher Salazar

  91. GaRZoL February 15, 2006 at 10:21 am - Reply

    another guideline for presentation:
    http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP269/CP269.pdf
    it comes from *really* smart people (RAND)

  92. EclectEcon February 15, 2006 at 10:51 pm - Reply

    Power Point: the 10-20-30 Rule

    I truly dislike PowerPoint presentations. I know they have their place and have phenomenal advantages in some situations, but every time I am subjected to one, no matter how good i…

  93. Lightman February 17, 2006 at 9:42 am - Reply

    La règle Powerpoint des 10/20/30

    Je viens de tomber par hasard sur le blog de Guy Kawasaki. Comme son nom ne l’indique pas, ce brave homme n’est ni français ni vendeur de motos, mais capital-risqueur californien. Une note de son blog m’a particulièrement intéressée :

  94. Navarik Windward: shipping software weblog February 24, 2006 at 4:02 pm - Reply

    PowerPoint rules

    A PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than 30 pt.

  95. No Copy March 11, 2006 at 5:51 am - Reply

    How to captivate an audience

    Read a nice post on Seth’s blog the other day. He’s right: creating a good PowerPoint presentation is not that easy. Making it interactive is one possibility. Taking the 10/20/30 rule into consideration another one.

  96. Hacktance March 13, 2006 at 2:10 pm - Reply

    La règle des 10/20/30 de la présentation

    Je viens de découvrir le blog de Guy Kawazaki: Bona tempora volvantur. On y trouve d’excellents conseils comme la règle des 10/20/30 de la présentation type PowerPoint.

  97. Florida Venture Blog by Dan Rua March 15, 2006 at 10:30 am - Reply

    Put the Wow up Front!

    Hackoff.com author and serial entrepreneur Tom Evslin has been posting a nice VC Primer from an Entrepreneur’s POV. He is on target with most of his thoughts and his recent post regarding VC presentations is a good read. Guy has also chimed in on VC …

  98. Andrea March 30, 2006 at 5:40 pm - Reply

    Re: your comment – “The only difference between you and venture capitalist is that he is getting paid to gamble with someone else’s money.”
    I think you’ve described a commonality between the VC and the entrepreneur, rather than a difference.
    The reality check many would-be amazing entpreneurs (and all their staff who natter for a raise before actually producing anything) should get a smack over the head with is that once they’ve got in VC funds, THEY, themselves, are being paid to gamble with someone else’s money.

  99. Arun's blog: pricing, processes, venturing March 31, 2006 at 6:01 am - Reply

    Presenting a little better

    I suck at presentations.. and Im working hard to improve myself. Ive come a long way from where I was a couple of years ago, but hey, its a work in progress.
    A Client told me the other day this uebertruth: NEVER use the same presen…

  100. Specialty Insurance Blog April 10, 2006 at 3:00 am - Reply

    Giving Presentations

    Many presentations, especially in the insurance business, are not exciting. Yet there are many resources for quality presentations. We have found these posts both short (like a good presentation) and helpful. Guy Kawasaki – The 10/20/40 Rule Guy Kawasa…

  101. nazzy April 12, 2006 at 12:21 pm - Reply

    I used to be of the same opinion, but then I saw this presentation video by Dick Hardt:

  102. erde April 17, 2006 at 2:42 pm - Reply

    Interesting article.

  103. has_many :through May 1, 2006 at 9:28 pm - Reply

    Presenting: ME

    Hey, this is kind of cool. Next week I’m going to be doing a short presentation at the San Francisco Ruby Meetup. The topic is how to contribute to the Ruby on Rails open source project. Because, you know, after just one patch being accepted I’m a total e

  104. The Intuitive Life Business Blog May 15, 2006 at 10:16 am - Reply

    Use Powerpoint to enhance your presentation, not cripple it

    I’m not the first person to point out that Microsoft’s mainstay meeting and presentation application Powerpoint is usually anathema to any sort of useful communication, and that most speakers rely on it as a crutch rather than a memory jog, but I just …

  105. PigPog May 23, 2006 at 4:48 am - Reply

    Giving More Engaging Presentations

    Latest Update: Expanded and improved a lot, with a whole lot of help from Gary at Thumbrella.
    Giving a presentation can be a great way to use a bit more creativity at work than you might usually be able to do – or it can be a chance to drone on at the fr

  106. Brain Burps June 4, 2006 at 8:44 am - Reply

    Can Apple make me a better presenter?

    Well if I can learn any of the Steve Jobs magic then yes, they probably can so I decided to register…

  107. daft tv June 15, 2006 at 3:16 pm - Reply

    this is like powerpoint pudding
    nice base work
    but the top work is up to us

  108. Nick C. June 29, 2006 at 8:12 am - Reply

    I found the 10/20/30 rule to be the most useful part of your entire book. I had the opportunity to put it into action a few months ago at a (VANJ) Venture Association of New Jersey Event.
    As predicted there was no working projector, no cd- rom in for the laptop, and no microphone. Even though we were told to expect all three.
    Having read your book, I was fully prepared to belt out my presentation with no slides and I proceeded to follow your instructions to the letter.
    The result? Well since the topic of the luncheon was “Pitching to VC’s” I was honored to have the keynote speaker Chris Sugden of Edison Venture Fund remark to the audience that my speech was a perfect example of how to deliver!
    As a result I made two great Angel connections at the luncheon.
    Fundraising has not been easy, but you’ve helped clear a lot of the fogginess and I thank you for you effort, advice and enthusiasm.
    – NC

  109. Zoli's Blog July 7, 2006 at 8:15 am - Reply

    Do your Graphics Say the Wrong Thing?

    Can you figure out what the sign says? I couldn’t. Find out why.

    Makes good sense to me. I see too many long winded presentations.
    I also like to use charts rather than bullet points, and talk around it.

  110. RobiNZ CAD Blog July 11, 2006 at 3:38 am - Reply

    Three numbers for better PowerPoint Presentations

    102030!The best advice is often the simplest; Remember three numbers Apply what they represent Youll make better PowerPoint Presentations. Guy Kawasaki tells you how

  111. Jim July 14, 2006 at 10:07 pm - Reply

    I was looking at Guy’s Law of Premoney valuation. I am curious why he has -$250K for each MBA. Is this tongue in cheek, or will an MBA truly destroy company value early on? If yes, what are the characteristics of the typical MBA that would put this drag on the organization?

  112. Harish B July 15, 2006 at 12:36 am - Reply

    Your blog is wonderful and informative. Great inspiration to the newcomers like me

  113. Medical Spas Online - The Blog July 17, 2006 at 10:14 pm - Reply

    What’s wrong with 90% of convention presentations?

    Everyone’s attended useless presentations. My guess is that 90% of all the speakers I’ve heard have fallen into one or more of the gaffs below.Which is sad. Hundreds of attendees have paid and given up time to learn something only to …

  114. uri July 18, 2006 at 8:26 am - Reply

    fantastic post – I think this rule has tremendous value
    **************************

    Thanks! Glad that you liked it.
    Guy

  115. RobiNZ CAD Blog July 19, 2006 at 3:59 am - Reply

    Three numbers for better PowerPoint Presentations

    10 20 30!The best advice is often the simplest; Remember three numbers Apply what they represent You’ll make better PowerPoint Presentations. Guy Kawasaki tells you how…The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint – Guy Kawasaki (It’s just one of his Top 10

  116. Vidize.com July 19, 2006 at 10:30 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki – Art of the Start

    Guy Kawasaki did a book called Art of the Start. He posts about that in his blog as well.
    This time, however, he has a video out. Both instructional and entertaining.
    Tags:No Tags…

  117. ben c. July 22, 2006 at 10:45 pm - Reply

    Hi Guy. This is totally unrelated to your main content, but still relevant to you 😉
    I got Meniere’s disease too. Mine attacks in the rainy season — when (I’m guessing) my colds clog my allergic nose, overloading the balancing mechanism in my ear.
    Doctors have recommended a slew of meds but in the end, it’s really just self-management as you say. I cut down on coffee and chocolate and inhale steam whenever my sinuses feel clogged.
    Ciao!
    ************************
    Ben,
    I’m so glad to hear (no pun intended) you have your Meniere’s figured out. I get about 3 attacks of vertigo per year. Maybe God is telling you to move to Hawaii! 🙂
    Aloha!
    Guy

  118. Dev July 23, 2006 at 10:49 pm - Reply

    “…contain no font smaller than thirty points.”
    How come most consultants’ slides use <20 pt fonts?

  119. linkage July 27, 2006 at 5:37 am - Reply

    http://www.abstractdynamics.org/linkage/archives/008127.html

    Signum sine tinnitu–by Guy Kawasaki: The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint…

  120. web tasarım July 29, 2006 at 3:02 pm - Reply

    Good work. I have to prepare often slide shows a month. Good work.web tasarm

  121. Scott Schnaars' KnuckleSandwich August 1, 2006 at 12:13 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasakis 10/20/30 Rule of Powerpoint

    I came across Guy Kawasakis 10/20/30 Rule for PowerPoint again today and I was really surprised that I hadnt referenced this in the past. Like most people, Ive sat through more than my fair share of really lousy presentations in w…

  122. superleveling August 6, 2006 at 10:52 pm - Reply

    yes!thx for your post,i remember it!!

  123. TechNovelty August 7, 2006 at 5:56 pm - Reply

    Die 10/20/30 Regel fr (PowerPoint-) Prsentationen

    Ich bin gerade auf einen lteren Beitrag auf Signum sine tinnitu dem Blog von Guy Kawasaki gestossen, er heisst The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint.
    [Um die Klammern um PowerPoint in der berschrift zu erklren: Meiner Meinung nach sollte di…

  124. jay August 8, 2006 at 9:09 am - Reply

    I can not open the pictures.
    http://static.flickr.com/28/58697220_0f5db5fe00.jpg
    who can help me?
    *^-^#

  125. imdb August 9, 2006 at 7:48 am - Reply

    http://www.imdb.cn
    [url]http://www.imdb.cn[/url]

  126. balle August 10, 2006 at 9:45 am - Reply

    hmmm… this is good. even though I am not sure about the font 30 part. I am a font 24 or a font 20 user and tend to think that I am pretty effective..

  127. Happenings of the UnderEmployed by Kevin McDonald August 11, 2006 at 9:14 am - Reply

    Five things to do at the start of every sales demo/presentation

    Five Things To Do At The Start Of Every Sales Demo/Presentation While working for SAP nearly a decade ago there was a Demo training us sales engineers were asked to attend. I can’t recall the name of the company that…

  128. Here's The Thing August 13, 2006 at 2:59 pm - Reply

    Really Bad PowerPoint Kills People

    No longer does Really Bad PowerPoint kill only brain cells and patience. Now it kills US soldiers. I have resisted commenting on Really Bad PowerPoint here because so many others do it better. Seth Godin coined the phrase, and Garr

  129. Doug Karr August 13, 2006 at 6:59 pm - Reply

    I’m an admitted bullet point cripple. I can’t seem to avoid them since it’s how I think… hierarchical and logical. One of the resources that assisted me with my Powerpoint Presentations is Cliff Atkinson’s Beyond Bullet Points. I have the freely distributed PDF if you’d like to see it. His approach is to make your point visually with your presentation – not with text. The science behind it is that people remember visuals but not text. Let your pictures do the talking… and talk about your pictures.
    Regards,
    Doug

  130. Futurelab's Blog August 14, 2006 at 12:47 am - Reply

    Everything You Wanted to Know About Getting a Job in Silicon Valley But Didn’t Know Who to Ask

    by: Guy Kawasaki Many people ask me for advice about getting a job in Silicon Valley, so heres the inside scoop. Not everyone will agree with this advice, and some will outright deny what Im saying, but if you use…

  131. Timothy Coote August 15, 2006 at 7:04 am - Reply

    All too true, even in Europe where communication is in English, which the majority of the participants use as their second language. The objective should be clarity above all and yet people bog themselves down with dozens of slides which the presenter more or less, reads. The result is – the audience reads faster than the presenter speaks and when finished they go to sleep until the next slide comes up (if the presenter is lucky and they haven’t passed into a deeper comatose state). I try to convince my clients to ditch bullet points completely and am surprised at how many still respond “…but what do we print out at the end?”

  132. make your dream come true August 16, 2006 at 6:58 pm - Reply

    10/20/30 Presentation Rules

    Guy Kawasaki 가 2005년 12월에 쓴 프리젠테이션 팁에 관한 글을 요약하자면, 1. 파워포인트는 10페이지 정도로, 2. 프리젠테이션은 20분정도, 3. 글자크기는 30포인트이상으로. 1. 가끔 사업계획서나, 프리젠테이션 자료를 보면 심지어 50장, 60장짜리도 있고, 컨설팅보고서를 보면 100장, 200장 되는 자료도 있다. 나 자신도 사람들이 그렇게 많은 양을 왜 굳이 파워포인트로 작성하려는지 모르겠다. 요약이 안 될만큼의 분량이라…

  133. Peter Kua August 17, 2006 at 11:08 pm - Reply

    many people have this silly perception that the thicker your report or the more PPT slides you show, the more intellectual and “great” you are. Sigh… I fall asleep after the 10th slide and your article couldn’t have been timelier!

  134. vEnkAt August 18, 2006 at 12:31 am - Reply

    “Total bozosity”
    aint it ‘Bogosity”!
    vEnkAt

  135. wholesale dvd players August 21, 2006 at 12:51 am - Reply

    you are so humorous.

  136. RadicalHop.com August 22, 2006 at 2:39 am - Reply

    10 reasons needed for venture capitalists to fund your idea

    Big time venture capitalists have hundreds, if not thousands, of business plans sent to them from aspiring entrepreneurs every month. As an entrepreneur looking for funding from venture capitalists, you would count yourself fortunate if one of them sin…

  137. Lee Schissler August 28, 2006 at 3:07 pm - Reply

    Kudos on your 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint!

  138. Will clearcut for food August 29, 2006 at 9:44 pm - Reply

    Thanks Guy.

    I hate PowerPoint. More precisely, I hate my PowerPoint. Granted, I know the rules, but apparently, I also like to sound of my own voice and the look of my own words. Conceptually, I well understand that less is more

  139. Quicklinks September 21, 2006 at 4:17 am - Reply

    links for 2006-09-21

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint (tags: presentations business) The Zen of Business Plans (tags: business startup) Blue Flavor (almost) a Year Later D. Keith Robinson reflects on the first year of running a business (tags: business webdesign) Real Wire…

  140. Blogue Vectis October 4, 2006 at 8:15 am - Reply

    Présentations PowerPoint efficaces, maîtrisez les 5 S !

    Un projecteur qui ne fonctionne pas. Des caractères trop petits à lécran. Un écran mal situé. Un auditoire dissipé (la journée a du retard et lheure du lunch approche), votre patron vous demande de clarifier votre idée. Voi…

  141. Zachary Romero October 4, 2006 at 8:03 pm - Reply

    Excellent rule!
    You hit in on the head.
    I laughed when you mentioned the 10 point type. I saw one of those recently. I read ahead.
    It is a bad “persuasion” presentation when you don’t take the necessary time to truly know your topic and just use your powerpoints as MAJOR points.
    Keep up the great posts!
    Zachary Romero
    www.profitableink.com
    Transforming Words Into Gold

  142. Markus Burgdorf October 10, 2006 at 12:33 am - Reply

    No tinnitus. no vertigo and no hearing loss anymore for our VC-Audition. Thanks, Guy, we just pressed our presentation to 10 slides with big letters – and that was a real good exercise. Point out the most important topics, forget the line of explanations, the special developed graphics and so on.
    It will be interesting to see and report, how our European VC-People accept such a presentation. I think, they are not used to 10 slides, so you get attention – but in Europe they might think you took it a bit to lazy. I’ll report on this in a month.
    amprice is the fastest growing online-marketplace in Germany, based on the Merchands input to develop a place, were they like to deal. We are building the community, which was lost at other marketplaces. And it works!

  143. Pozycjonowanie October 22, 2006 at 4:43 am - Reply

    In my experience the best presentations have hardly any text in them. I was once told a great presentation consists of three consistent parts: Hook, Point, Illustration and ends with Punch.
    So add to the 10/20/30 Rule and you’ve got a nice guideline to entertaining through quick and precise storytelling.

  144. rogerd's notebook November 20, 2006 at 5:24 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasakis Pitch Guide

    Last week I did a couple of presentations (on Community Building and Competitive Intelligence) at WebmasterWorlds Pubcon, and caught the opening keynote session by Guy Kawasaki. Guy is a funny and engaging speaker, and a good choice to kick of…

  145. Patrick McEvoy November 20, 2006 at 12:08 pm - Reply

    I recently sat through a 75 minute Power Point presentation with over 165 slides!
    5 years ago when the speaker started out he had 15 slides.
    He was a lot better speaker 5 years ago – at least I could remember the points he made.
    Now it’s a blur.
    We’re all infected with “more is better” to a fault.
    You’ve hit the nail right on the head with this one.
    Warmly,
    Patrick McEvoy
    President
    Rainmaker Gateway
    http://www.rainmakergateway.com

  146. DogBalls Blog November 22, 2006 at 9:07 pm - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki and more on Day One of Pubcon

    Audio of the Day: VV Show #39 – Guy Kawasaki Originally uploaded by divedi. Guy Kawasaki’s keynote was inspiring. The powerpoint-driven conference meets the un-conference keynoter. It’s a wonderful treat when you get more out of ten slides with two-word

  147. Pronet Advertising November 26, 2006 at 2:58 pm - Reply

    Using digg and Netscape to get traffic

    In the last couple of months more and more bloggers have been catching onto the power of [digg](http://www.digg.com) and [Netscape](http://www.netscape.com). Bloggers have realized that if they get their blog on the homepage of digg or Netscape thousan…

  148. Christopher - Drug law December 12, 2006 at 6:51 am - Reply

    I always tell people that you’re the proto-blogger, from back in the days of the EvangeList. So, let Winer take credit as being the first blogger, you’re the first I read regularly. Good to have you here as an actual blogger.

  149. Musings, Ramblings, and the Occasional Useful Information December 13, 2006 at 12:41 pm - Reply

    LiveMeeting Best Practices

    As part of my role here at Microsoft, I spend a significant amount of time in LiveMeeting doing presentations

  150. Anshu Sharma December 14, 2006 at 1:06 pm - Reply

    This rule rocks. I made a good (great?) presentation to a few execs but when they tried to read my slides, they squinted. And I knew I had broken ‘the rule’.
    Lesson learned. Others beware.

  151. Anonymous January 2, 2007 at 2:15 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    Ten is the optimal number of slides in a PowerPoint presentation because a normal human being cannot comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting and venture capitalists are very normal. (The only difference between you and venture capitalist is that…

  152. Marketing with Microsoft in the Mid-Atlantic January 2, 2007 at 7:29 pm - Reply

    Great Guidelines on Effective PowerPoint

    http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2005/12/the_102030_rule.html A must read…

  153. Rob Llewellyn January 9, 2007 at 4:06 pm - Reply

    It’s like alcohol abuse. Most people know that too much content won’t do them any good and yet so many will still go out and make a bloody idiot of themselves in front of large groups of people. Some now and then; others at every given opportunity. There should be a health warning on every PowerPoint packet; “Excess content can cause hearing loss, ringing in the ears or vertigo”.

  154. Tommi's S60 applications blog January 12, 2007 at 4:11 am - Reply

    Ripple effects of iPhone

    I have tried to avoid this overly-talked-about subject, but can’t help since Jari asked so kindly: It would be fantastic to hear a bit more about your thoughts on the iPhone, the (positive) challenge it throws on S60 and…

  155. LandingTheDeal January 12, 2007 at 2:00 pm - Reply

    Using PowerPoint to Sell

    PowerPoint can either make the sale, or kill it.It can either stir an audiences mind, or put them to sleep.It will either keep your audience focused on you, or on the slides that youre trying to talk to them about.I…

  156. eStartup January 12, 2007 at 5:44 pm - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

    Guy Kawasaki,  Apple Evangelist turned  Venture Capitalist (Garage.com) also blogs.  As I was wandering the net, I ran into a posting/rant about Powerpoint presentations.  As he tends to see a lot of them, the  good, the bad and the ugly,  he has…

  157. Matt Perez January 12, 2007 at 8:49 pm - Reply

    For sales presentations, I follow and train people in the 3-to-5 rule:
    * 3-to-5 slides
    * 3-to-5 bullets
    * 3-to-5 words

  158. Michael Vu January 25, 2007 at 4:31 am - Reply

    Great article, and great book in “The Art of the Start.”
    My partner and I have found you to be an incredibly helpful resource in our quests as entrepreneurs. I hope to meet you one day to thank you and get you on our side =P.
    What a great Guy (no pun intended =P)!

  159. FiberGeneration January 26, 2007 at 6:38 am - Reply

    Top-Ten Of Guy Kawasaki

    As I like to do business as unusual, here is the first of a series of Top-Ten lists. Usually, you publish that kind of thing at the end of the year. I like to publish mine after everybody, at the

  160. ventasEnInternet.com January 30, 2007 at 2:32 pm - Reply

    Regla 10/20/30 de las presentaciones en Power Point

    Re-leyendo a Guy Kawasaki, un verdadero personaje en el mundo del marketing mundial, volví a encontrar un artículo que no veía hace mucho tiempo.
    Su teoría es bastante simple. Una presentación de PowerPoint debe tener diez diapositivas, no debe du…

  161. dantiernan.com Blog February 13, 2007 at 8:28 am - Reply

    Bad Powerpoint – different views on what makes a good pitch

    Seth Godin recently reposted his views on how so many companies create really bad powerpoint decks with uninspiring, boring information presentation. His key message – a picture is worth a 1,000 words.
    For example:
    Can you trust job candidate intervie…

  162. Rico February 15, 2007 at 3:42 am - Reply

    …but you’re using a Windows laptop, so it will take forty minutes to make it work with the projector…

    Couldn’t help yourself could you?
    What I like about your post is that it quantifies what makes an effective presentation, something very useful for technically-minded people like yours truly.

  163. sernak plywood February 24, 2007 at 3:20 am - Reply

    This is good , thank you from Turkey www.sernak.com

  164. Brian Laks February 28, 2007 at 1:46 am - Reply

    That was great! I wish I could have read that four years ago when I was giving powerpoint presentations (it seems like daily) at USC.

  165. Tony Zaki February 28, 2007 at 1:21 pm - Reply

    This is one of the best (and easiest) tips on presentation techniques that I’ve heard.
    I also think and others may attest to it: Present the best you can, and if you have to, use powerpoint.
    http://www.TonyZaki.com

  166. Thomas March 1, 2007 at 3:12 am - Reply

    While 10/20/30 is might be good for making pitches, I am not sure this rule would be strictly applicable to all PPT presentations. I think specifially of presentations intent on presenting research results. For a general audience 10/20/30 would be appropriate, but for specialists one must expand that rule to 20 at most.
    I would like to suggest a revision to your rule 0/10/20/30 Absolutely 0 animations/ transitions/ or sounds unless they relate directly to the presentation … I can’t tell you how annoying it is to listen to a speaker begin to bumble as they are distracted by animations they forgot about.

  167. An Open Mind March 6, 2007 at 12:45 pm - Reply

    Presentations and Pitches, RE Style

    And by RE I mean Renaissance Entrepreneur, a term coined and slightly explored in the previous post of this blog. I’m sure many people who read this have already read Guy Kawasaki’s famous 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint; in case you

  168. The Complete Opposite March 6, 2007 at 4:50 pm - Reply

    Extraordinary: Presentations

    Here are a couple of links that will help you give extraordinary presentations. Enjoy! OSCON 2005 Keynote – Identity 2.0 (must watch!)Dick Hardt | Founder CEO, Sxip Identityhttp://identity20.com/media/OSCON2005/The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint by Guy Ka…

  169. sanateseri March 10, 2007 at 5:48 pm - Reply

    I have been making slideshows since 1970, back when it took 4 hours to make the original art for a color slide. PowerPoint is very good, and fast, for making outstanding slide shows. I agree with Guy on his approach to slide shows. Business pitches are a little different than training programs, but there is much more to developing a presentation.
    Review this article I wrote regarding visual communication http://www.jrneaves.com/instructional_graphics.htm.
    The biggest abuse I have witnessed is the use of “stupid” text animation and spot animations that add no value to the visual communication (i.e. “the dancing rabbit”, “barking dog”, and so forth.
    The most important part of the presentation is the complete, expert knowledge of the subject matter by the presenter. Complete knowledge of the subject matter eliminates the need for “wordy” slides and reading the slide to the audiance from the slide, normally with your back turned to the audiance. Remember, the slide show is there to support the message and information transfer. It is NOT the message.
    PowerPoint is a tool. It does not relieve the presenter of being and integral part of the presentation and message transfer, regardless of whether it is a business presentation or a training program.

  170. Ian Graham March 13, 2007 at 5:43 pm - Reply

    First time visitor, found my way here through the links from some local blogs.
    Great post and sage words regarding power point and pitching.
    I agree with the other comment regarding 0/10/20/30 modification.
    Also wanted to mention a rule that has served me well called the 6X6 rule for text slides. No more than 6 bullets per page of 6 words per bullet. This way your bullets are speaking points to remind you what to say and avoid that painful reading from the slide thing.
    Alternately a picture really is worth a thousand words and if you can make your point with a picture it can add variety to the presentation.

  171. New venture outsourcing blog March 14, 2007 at 3:12 pm - Reply

    10-20-30

    We see a fair number of formal and informal pitches (presentations to the uninitiated).  I was asked to be part of a review panel today my parting advice was the now famous 10-20-30 rule:
    10 Slides
    20 Minutes
    30 Point Font
    This rough guide is …

  172. Wahyd Vannoni March 20, 2007 at 11:56 am - Reply

    Best presentation on SlideShare is not the Best presentation live!
    There is a fundamental mistake presentors make when using visual aids such as powerpoint. They confuse their notes (which is a roadmap to know what to say and in what order), with visual aids (which should only be used when a visual can render a concept more effectively than words).
    In most presentations, the “slides” become the notes thus diminishing the value-added of the presenter.
    SlideShare presentations however, do not have a presenter. Nobody is sitting next to you to comment on the slides. Therefore it OK to have more text than you would if it were a live presentation.
    Nobody would think that a great TV ad could be a great radio ad and vice versa. Therefore, the conclusion is this: the best presentation for slideshare will not be the best one to present live.

  173. vibhash April 5, 2007 at 5:45 am - Reply

    Hie there,
    Thanks for this great post, i’ll indefinitely try to implement in my future presentations:)
    vib.

  174. minikperi April 7, 2007 at 6:16 pm - Reply

    Gr8 post!
    Where would u include finance in those slides. I tried to contain my presentation in 10 slides but that is one more slide i have to put in. Last discussion I had with some angel investors, whole meeting turned in discussion rather than power pt controlling the flow.

  175. hannes April 14, 2007 at 7:15 am - Reply

    Finally someone who also is annoyed from dozens of powerpoint slides. Some people seem that they just want to show how much they can do with ppt and forget about the audience.

  176. barrydavret.com April 15, 2007 at 2:16 pm - Reply

    Executive Communication

    One of the biggest challenges Project Managers (and even Functional Managers) seem to have is that they tend to communicate to executives the same way they communicate with a Business Analyst, Programmer, or Manager.  This often results in frustrat…

  177. En Avant April 28, 2007 at 1:40 am - Reply

    Guy Kawasaki VC blog

    Came across Guy Kawasakis blog last night. Hes a successful US VC and seems to have a large following in the US. I particularly like his Top 3 posts, which offer good advice for those seeking VC money.
    The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint…

  178. Notes from a Tool User April 30, 2007 at 10:59 am - Reply

    Time to Trash PowerPoint? No just be smarter in using it.

    I’ve been doing a number of presentations in the past few months and so was very interested when I came across an newspaper article saying: The use of the PowerPoint presentation has been a disaster. It should be ditched. —

  179. Reflexions May 2, 2007 at 7:14 pm - Reply

    PowerPoint when Thinking is Critical

    The year I worked for Dave Snowden’s IBM Cynefin Centre, I was required to use the official Big Blue PowerPoint template. Based on 12pt Arial, the template was impossible to read, even close to the screen. The year after, when Cynefin went independent …

  180. Sportsbook May 3, 2007 at 11:26 am - Reply

    I feel powerpoint has completely taken the creativity out of presentations.
    Sportsbook Bonuses

  181. Recensioni Libri May 5, 2007 at 3:47 am - Reply

    powerpoint is useful when you must interact with the presentation or you must show some multimedia files, animated graphs and so on… if you have to pass a message sometimes is better to use the “ancient”… but useful paper.

  182. Ed Grimes May 7, 2007 at 1:06 pm - Reply

    This will help me with my power point (I’ve committed a few of those sins in the past). It’s a great tool in the hands of someone who knows how to use it. Most everyone else should stick to a flip chart and magic marker.

  183. justine May 9, 2007 at 4:19 am - Reply

    what do you think of this one??
    http://www.eubaspro.com

  184. justin May 10, 2007 at 4:56 am - Reply

    this one is here for your pleasure
    http://www.easyzarabra.com

  185. Master the Business May 17, 2007 at 11:43 am - Reply

    PowerPoint 10/20/30 rule

    When you are preparing a presentation, you have to determine if you are teaching or preaching.
    In December, Guy Kawasaki had a great post on how to build a PowerPoint presenation. I recommend you read the entire post, but here are some key points:
    Ten …

  186. Loric May 31, 2007 at 9:20 am - Reply

    That was so inspiring I think that my newspaper will turn out to be a big hit. Thank you.

  187. Arco June 6, 2007 at 10:00 am - Reply

    This regime makes presentations better. Thanks. Still, ppt is a monologue at core – unable to adjust to a welcome, hopefully, new idea-detour that could arise between slide 4 and 5 making 6,7…obsolete.
    http://www.arcocarib.com

  188. Jeff the Great June 8, 2007 at 3:22 pm - Reply

    I mean this in the best possible way:
    of all the things that Guy has contributed to the business community, the 10/20/30 rule is the greatest.

  189. Laura June 8, 2007 at 6:30 pm - Reply

    Guy, you are a genius. My family said that this couldn’t be done, but I did it, and got great feedback. I’m onto my second presentation as a born again PowerPoint user!

  190. Freelance Website Design June 11, 2007 at 7:42 pm - Reply

    One of my favorite things about linux is no powerpoint 🙂 I am not a fan. But those who endure and use it on the regular… kudos… I doubt very hightly that you are having fun.

  191. Professionally Speaking.... June 14, 2007 at 5:55 pm - Reply

    INSPIRE AND PERSUADE WITHOUT THE POWERPOINT

    I just finished writing a speech and building a PowerPoint presentation for a client. (How ubiquitous PowerPoint is these days!) This is a speech designed to persuade the audience to use the services of an organization which they distrust and

  192. JNC -- Joris NarrowCasting Corporation June 15, 2007 at 11:00 am - Reply

    3 regels voor een goede ppt!

    Volg de 10-20-30 regel:
    10 slides
    20 minuten
    30: fontsize
    blog artikel

  193. The Group of 6 June 25, 2007 at 10:05 pm - Reply

    How is your presentation

    I recently attended an errors and omissions insurance seminar that featured a power point. Jealous? I was shocked that people still create power points that are word for word with what the speaker is saying. Please never do that. The

  194. Kevin Smith July 9, 2007 at 10:52 am - Reply

    Guy –
    You recommend (in your book “The Art of the Start”) that people only use dark colored backgrounds on PowerPoints. I was always told to only use LIGHT colored backgrounds so that meeting attendees could take notes on the printed presentation. Any thoughts on this?

  195. Jaye Ramsey Sutter, J.D. July 11, 2007 at 8:04 pm - Reply

    Nothing really important can be reduced to power-point.
    Would Lincoln have put the Gettysberg Address on Power-Point?
    Would Franklin Roosevelt have put anything he ever said in a Power-Point presentation?
    Skip the power-point. Look me in the eye and tell me what you want to do. I can understand it without the C.B. DeMille special effects. If you can’t explain it without the Power-Point, you don’t understand what you want to do.

  196. Cog July 23, 2007 at 12:02 am - Reply

    Ten Things You Didnt Know About GuyKawasaki

    “The only thing worse than a presentation which sucks is a presentation which sucks and you don’t know how much longer it will suck.”
    Some of you have been asking for me to put up my fantastic and in-depth interview with Guy. So here it is – Form…

  197. games August 4, 2007 at 10:06 pm - Reply

    Have to say, you’re selling yourself short if you think this is only applicable to entrepreneurs and venture capital. I’m an academic (a catch-all term for someone who spends most of his time with his nose in a book and has very little chance of seeing the kind of money a successful entrepreneur would make), but the same basic principle apply, and they apply in an awful lot of situations. The most obvious of course is conference lectures. It is becoming more and more common (even in dusty disciplines like mine: literature) to utilize technology in a presentation, and all that you’ve said is true of a venture capitalist is also true of a conference audience. It’s also true, however, in print: particularly in terms of trying to sell yourself to a publisher. Finally, though some of my colleagues forget this, it is true of teaching. Students, whatever we choose to believe, can only digest so much information at a time, can only read print that is so small, and have short attention spans. So you are actually much wiser than you know, but I definitely like the easy formula you’ve created.

  198. Mission to Learn August 8, 2007 at 4:21 pm - Reply

    Life by PowerPoint

    A couple of years ago I led a panel on online learning among nonprofit organizations at N-TEN’s National Technology Conference. As it happened, Guy Kawasaki was one of the keynote speakers at the conference, and I had the pleasure of

  199. sampath August 12, 2007 at 11:57 pm - Reply

    1) By the way check this company Medefile International. They are the market leader in a $30 billion industry. This industry is starting just now, they have a lot of room to grow. They have teamed up to bring personal health records using Apple’s iphone. Their stock is going to hit through the roof. People who get in and purchase early will reap a truck load of money. Their stock symbol is MDFI.OB. Check it out.
    2) By the way check this company MDFI. Their stock is going to hit the roof because of the recent announcements with bringing personal health information through iphone. Folks who get in now will see this stock price increase multiple times. Also check this Webpage where they have some more information about the stock http://www.growurmoney.com/medefile/
    blog.theinvestmentmachine.com/guest-blogger.html
    hyipblog.nobshyip.net
    will_johnston.blogspot.com/2007/05/seeking-good
    www.blogcatalog.com/post-tag/investment
    www.fool.com

  200. Kevin Norman August 16, 2007 at 8:58 pm - Reply

    Nice article. Also known as “Less is more”

  201. The Scrawl August 17, 2007 at 8:18 am - Reply

    Embrace a constraint – write a (true) rumor!

    Ive been a fan of Guy Kawasaki since I attended his lecture at the University of Minnesota a few months back (his 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint has revolutionized the way I present notes to students in my English composition classes). In a blog p…

  202. Metagg August 24, 2007 at 5:06 pm - Reply

    Metagg is tracking this post

    Find out what Social News Sites are discussing this post over at metagg.com

  203. Teknopataren txokoa August 26, 2007 at 3:20 pm - Reply

    Aurkezpenak egiteko 10-20-30 araua

    Aspaldiko maczaleon artean izen ezaguna da Guy Kawasakirena, bera izan baitzen bere garaian Macintoshen aldeko ebanjelizazioa egiteko EvangeList posta zerrendaren arduradun eta sustatzailea. Steve Jobsen enpresak erabiltzaileen sustenguar…

  204. Pierluigi Rotundo September 9, 2007 at 1:17 pm - Reply

    I tested it two days ago…it works!

  205. The Troublek Blog September 13, 2007 at 7:26 am - Reply

    10 Tips for a Killer

    10 Tips for a Killer Presentation

  206. Being an Intrapreneur September 13, 2007 at 3:16 pm - Reply

    Pitching your idea

    As an intrapreneur you will have great ideas all the time (at least I have :-)). After thinking a little bit more of them, the most “great” ideas, are not that “great” anymore. But occasionaly you really have an idea, you are so convinced of, that you …

  207. Pierluigi Rotundo September 15, 2007 at 3:16 am - Reply

    quotin…
    Nothing really important can be reduced to power-point.
    Would Lincoln have put the Gettysberg Address on Power-Point?
    Would Franklin Roosevelt have put anything he ever said in a Power-Point presentation?
    Skip the power-point. Look me in the eye and tell me what you want to do. I can understand it without the C.B. DeMille special effects. If you can’t explain it without the Power-Point, you don’t understand what you want to do.
    im my humble opinion, a Powerpoint presentation could help you pitch your idea 1000 times better than pages of business plans…

  208. Pierluigi Rotundo September 16, 2007 at 12:26 am - Reply

    quotin…
    Guy –
    You recommend (in your book “The Art of the Start”) that people only use dark colored backgrounds on PowerPoints. I was always told to only use LIGHT colored backgrounds so that meeting attendees could take notes on the printed presentation. Any thoughts on this?
    dear kevin,
    i always use a dark background presentation, but when i print it, i add a space with lines for notes:) it’s the best way in my opinion!

  209. Azdırıcılar September 17, 2007 at 2:24 am - Reply

    This regime makes presentations better. Thanks. Still, ppt is a monologue at core – unable to adjust to a welcome, hopefully, new idea-detour that could arise between slide 4 and 5 making 6,7…obsolete.

  210. Pierluigi Rotundo September 18, 2007 at 3:12 am - Reply

    I agree…for this reason you need a great presenter, rather than a great presentation…

  211. Coderights September 21, 2007 at 12:40 pm - Reply

    Getting funded: just a few notes

    geovisit(); Here’s a quick summary of the TC40 discussion on getting funded. First, if you’re like most of us– that is, not from Stanford, and not with serial credentials– the overall message was to just focus on bringing the…

  212. Caffeinated Coder September 21, 2007 at 10:04 pm - Reply

    Cultivating Good Audience Karma with the 10/20/30 Rule

    Cultivating Good Audience Karma with the 10/20/30 Rule

  213. StL Biotech September 24, 2007 at 8:01 am - Reply

    Casual Friday: Pecha Kucha

    I’ll admit straightaway that I’m a sucker for good presenters. It’s kind of a sad infatuation, actually, since they’re such a rare breed these days. Much has been written about different techniques for giving explosive, emotion-filled presentations (My…

  214. Read/WriteWeb October 4, 2007 at 1:23 am - Reply

    How To Create a Web App

    This is the second post in our series on how to run a startup and develop a product. In part one, How To Bootstrap Your Startup, we outlined the process of bootstrapping your company into existence. In this post, we…

  215. Isidro October 4, 2007 at 6:01 pm - Reply

    I suggest to bloggers such as yourself: please get to the point soonest. For example, “The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint: It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.” And then the 10 point list. The following text could have the rest, the clever chatter, and other details. There is so much to read these days, I wonder why people post two or three paragraphs of usually not-funny, not-interesting text. At least, I wonder this when I read info-type articles. I read your article for the info, which I liked, and thank you for it. Sorry for my own wordiness.

  216. Alice October 7, 2007 at 2:30 pm - Reply

    Thanks for your time and energy. It’s refreshing to see somone who is thoroughly excited.
    Once again…thanks.

  217. CanTheWorldHearMe October 8, 2007 at 6:43 am - Reply

    The amazing 10/20/30 rule that nobody listensto

    Ever make a Powerpoint? Of course you have and in high school we do it a lot. But sadly most of them are BORING AS HELL!
    Until Guy Kawasaki came along, most people would type everything they could onto their Powerpoint into tiny 3 point font and then j…

  218. Pierluigi Rotundo October 11, 2007 at 2:45 pm - Reply

    How can we apply the 10 20 30 rule to a business plan?
    Just thinking…

  219. OZ October 16, 2007 at 1:03 am - Reply

    This was a great bit of advice..
    to the point and precise.. and i thank you for the same..
    Wonderfull.. you may have started a new company here..
    Thanks

  220. Pierluigi Rotundo October 16, 2007 at 3:19 am - Reply

    Lol, the PPT company…just doing executive presentations…
    Pierluigi Rotundo

  221. Scott Allen October 22, 2007 at 2:48 pm - Reply

    LOL. Entertaining post, but ultimately great advice on presenting. Being a designer of high-end PowerPoints for several years now, I can say that you are on to something here. It’s true about font sizes…people forget when they are laying it out on their screen that the text will look tiny when viewed from a distance, even on a large screen. I especially liked the part about it taking 40 minutes to get a Windows laptop to work with the projector. 🙂

  222. Articles October 29, 2007 at 7:46 pm - Reply

    Nice informative article. thanks for sharing and keep sharing such kind of articles, as these articles really helpful for experienced and new comers.
    Directory

  223. Influence October 31, 2007 at 7:18 am - Reply

    Online Slide Shows: Not So Scary

    It’s Halloween today, and I have a scary topic to discuss. No, this is not about ghost or goblins or even terrorism, wildfires, or avian flu. No, I’m here to discuss the horror of online slide shows.
    Despite Edward Tufte’s PowerPoint critique,
    slide s

  224. Internet Marketing Blog November 3, 2007 at 12:52 am - Reply

    Yikes, I think I have Ménière’s too!

  225. Six Minutes November 8, 2007 at 10:14 am - Reply

    250 Things to Guarantee Your SpeakingSuccess?

    Eric Feng on the Public Speaking Blog recently posted 250 Things You Wish You Know That Will Guarantee Your Speaking Success. Im skeptical when I read phrases such as guarantee your speaking success, and Im even more skeptic…

  226. gowri November 13, 2007 at 10:53 pm - Reply

    The stock has gained 150% from Oct 8, 2007 to Oct 22, 2007.
    By the way check this company MDFI. Their stock is set to increase because of their association with Apple iphone and Complete Care Medical. Find more about this company and stock http://www.growurmoney.com/medefile/

  227. Serkan / Tokyotronic November 14, 2007 at 9:54 pm - Reply

    This rule is really becoming famous. I read about the 10/20/30 rule in the printed version of German business magazine “Wirtschaftswoche” (kind of Business Weekly for German speaking countries).
    They covered Powerpoint’s 20th birthday and elaborated on Guy’s advice in a separate text box (his name was mentioned)!

  228. Matt Pilgrim - Talking 'Soft November 15, 2007 at 9:48 am - Reply

    Tips for raising capital……

    Following on from my last post I thought I’d share a few tips on raising capital funds. It always helps

  229. Noticias externas November 15, 2007 at 10:12 am - Reply

    Tips for raising capital……

    Following on from my last post I thought I’d share a few tips on raising capital funds. It always helps

  230. sernak plywood November 23, 2007 at 4:55 am - Reply

    Very good post. I agree that PP presentations should be made as painless as possible

  231. Tina Nguyen November 25, 2007 at 5:28 pm - Reply

    Have you ever seen Don McMillan’s presentation on how to give a PowerPoint presentation? You can find him easily on YouTube. He’s a former engineer and now a comedian. He makes good points on how to give a PowerPoint presentation, but in a funny way…

  232. kolton November 26, 2007 at 7:21 am - Reply

    hello guy kawasaki this is AWESOME!!!

  233. TroubleK November 26, 2007 at 12:29 pm - Reply

    10 Tips for a Killer

    10 Tips for a Killer Presentation

  234. seksuel November 27, 2007 at 4:42 am - Reply

    Although I’ve only seen a few pitch presentations, I would say that instead of making the rule 10 slides, make it 10 concepts, because sometimes you may want to have say 3 or 4 slides to convey a concept.
    That and I’ve always been a huge fan of the Steve Jobs keynotes. 🙂 Great Article. There are far to many bad presentations out there.

  235. The Sales Wars December 27, 2007 at 7:11 am - Reply

    For Those About to Powerpoint, We SaluteYou

    When we posted our question on www.linkedin.com about the worst sales cliches, we received a fairly decent number of responses that made their way into our Twelve Days of Sales Cliches diddy.
    One of the responses inspired this post.
    From …

  236. sk-rt.com March 28, 2008 at 6:40 am - Reply

    The 10/20/30 Rule

    I am trying to evangelize the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.

  237. Open Sources | Rodrigues & Urlocker June 13, 2008 at 6:55 am - Reply

    What do you do?

    There’s an interesting post from a few weeks back by Guy Kawasaki in an article entitled “How to pickup a VC.” While it’s a short piece illustrating how boneheaded “attention grabbers” will work against you with VCs, I think it’s actually quite a good …

  238. SortiPreneur November 9, 2008 at 11:14 pm - Reply

    Powerpoint

    I frequently find myself presenting using slides and always feel like I am not doing as good a job as can be done. I am very interested in effective presentation methods. Seth Godin has periodically written about the topic and…

  239. Conor February 27, 2015 at 8:40 am - Reply

    Very nice post. Thanks for the great tips.

  240. Juan Franco June 29, 2015 at 12:25 pm - Reply

    Very Good

  241. Nic August 28, 2015 at 10:09 am - Reply

    nice tips, however they are completely irrelevant in my industry… often times we have 50, 60, 70+ page decks for presentations running for 8 hours or more. 30 point font, while nice doesn’t always work with graphs, finance, org charts, etc…

  242. karl walters September 3, 2015 at 6:27 am - Reply

    insightful tips on how to create a valid power point

  243. Eddie Caplan November 5, 2015 at 12:05 pm - Reply

    Often, the bottom 1/3 of the screens are obscured by the heads of the people in the front rows. I’ve stopped putting anything interesting down there except our company logo and URL.

  244. Patrick Roettger January 21, 2016 at 12:48 am - Reply

    Guy,
    fully agree with your comments. See my (humble) view of a similar subject here:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/presentation-trap-patrick-roettger?trk=mp-author-card

  245. Mila Rad March 30, 2016 at 8:40 am - Reply

    This is great. Thanks. Presentations are hard enough. Also, Dude, If you haven’t already, test for MTHFR gene mutations and supplement accordingly. Ménière’s and its symptoms are tied to this genetic lapse. MDs don’t think about this as much as they should, let alone know about it. Pioneers like Dr. Ben Lynch and Dr. Amy Yasko are good places to glean more info.

  246. Miguel Monteiro June 17, 2016 at 3:49 am - Reply

    First absolute rule of PowerPoint: “There’s no such thing as a PowerPoint Presentation!”

  247. Jason Johnston October 7, 2016 at 6:28 am - Reply

    I tried the last suggestion “find out the age of the oldest person in your audience and divide it by two. That’s your optimal font size” for my high school class – but the kids still couldn’t read the 8 point font. I guess I’ll never get this new approach to presentations…

  248. Travis March 16, 2017 at 9:05 am - Reply

    I am doing a PowerPoint project for one of my college classes. I found this to extremely helpful and very valuable information, I am glad that I found this site,

  249. Bill Moore May 4, 2017 at 1:30 pm - Reply

    Good advice, but hey … why doesn’t Guy make the 10/20/30 mandatory and kick out anyone who violates it? Can’t be that hard.

    Guy, repeat after me: “My time, My money, My rules.” There. Problem solved … and once word gets around you then won’t have to preach 10/20/30 because everyone will already know.

  250. Zhaksylyk September 18, 2017 at 1:17 pm - Reply

    Mr. Kawasaki what does team, business model, projections and milestones mean points are about?

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