MP3: The Art of Raising Capital

Istock 000000679590Small

Here’s another MP3 recording. It is my reading of Chapter 7: The Art of Raising Capital from The Art of the Start. It covers some of the same material as my blog entries, but sometimes hearing is believing.

Download raising.mp3

By | 2016-10-24T14:28:32+00:00 February 23rd, 2006|Categories: Books, Pitching and Presenting, Venture Capital|Tags: |17 Comments

About the Author:

Guy Kawasaki is the chief evangelist of Canva, an online graphic design tool. Formerly, he was an advisor to the Motorola business unit of Google and chief evangelist of Apple. He is also the author of The Art of Social Media, The Art of the Start, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur, Enchantment, and nine other books. Kawasaki has a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA as well as an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

17 Comments

  1. steve February 23, 2006 at 12:35 pm - Reply

    Arrrrgggghhhhhhhhh!!!! First Slate, and now you. Is there anyone out there besides me that doesn’t enjoy being read to and hates it when content is moved from something you can read to something you have to listen to?
    I guess I’m not a member of the podcast revolution 🙁

  2. Pius February 23, 2006 at 12:39 pm - Reply

    Is it really a big deal? You can always go out there and buy the book. In fact, I highly recommend it . . . worth the money.

  3. ELS February 23, 2006 at 12:49 pm - Reply

    He Steve, remind me not to drive next to you on the freeway.

  4. Smittie February 23, 2006 at 1:09 pm - Reply

    I like podcasts. Podcasts have completely eliminated any interest in commercial radio.
    I like blogs too. Blogs and RSS feeds from Associated Press, Reuters, and a few others eliminate my use for commercial newspapers save in my rabbit’s hutch.
    Between the two I’ve gone a long way toward eliminating the influence of editors and advertisers in my life. We pulled the plug on our TV about six years ago. Definitely one of the best things we’ve ever done.
    Audio in Blogs is something different. It was interesting to hear Guy Kawasaki read chapter 3. I’ll probably give this one a go.
    Aloha

  5. doru February 23, 2006 at 1:18 pm - Reply

    1. Content is easier to be listen to while doing smth. else.
    2. Audio has the feeling of a more real interaction w/ the audience.
    3. It’a a good way to sell more books if the content is cool.
    Hey, Guy, you’ve changed your blog title.

  6. Brad Hutchings February 23, 2006 at 1:24 pm - Reply

    You need a show on Sirius. If just 1% of the people in China listened, you’d be bigger than Howard Stern.

  7. Patrick February 23, 2006 at 1:25 pm - Reply

    That was a good listen. It is a lot of common sense. I use to think that it took a great idea that truly helped people. After listening to that I can see it still takes that plus a lot more.

  8. steve February 23, 2006 at 4:35 pm - Reply

    If it makes you feel better, I don’t read while I drive :). Heck, I don’t even like to talk on my phone while I drive. And I don’t own a Blackberry so I never check email when I drive.
    I enjoy reading and I can read faster than I can generally listen to someone read something to me (I hate lecturers who give you their whole presentation — though it does give me a chance to nap after I read it). I like this blog and I like Slate and so I get a little annoyed when they say “Check out this great content” but won’t let me read it.
    My other thing is, and I have this thing with TV news as well, is that when I read something, I can control the mental filtering and my BS-detector, plus it’s easier for me to do any associated research I need in order to fully appreciate the content.
    Maybe this just means I’m slow 🙂

  9. Harry Chong February 23, 2006 at 4:37 pm - Reply

    Hey guy, is this you reading? I’ve never heard your voice before

  10. Digital Web Magazine - Daily News February 23, 2006 at 4:44 pm - Reply

    The Startup

    For those starting up your own business and for those who don’t know Guy Kawasaki has started blogging. And for those who don’t know Guy, you should. He’s the author of Art of the Start, a book I found really handy while starting my own business up. Th…

  11. Sabine Cretella February 23, 2006 at 5:01 pm - Reply

    I already read that in the book … hearing gave it a very different touch. It will help me a lot within our project WiktionaryZ and all its connected activities – a non profit project – one of those thought to make the world a better place.
    Thank you!
    Sabine

  12. Simply Audio Blog February 23, 2006 at 5:09 pm - Reply

    Wow, people love/hate podcasts

    Im not much of a podcast person, but Im surprised to see the extremes of opinion when it comes to the subject. Guy Kawasaki created an audio version of a chapter of one of his books, and the comments range from something like I hat…

  13. Guy Kawasaki February 23, 2006 at 5:52 pm - Reply

    Harry,
    Yes, it’s me. Pidgin accent and all!
    Shaka!
    Guy

  14. Cem Dalgic February 24, 2006 at 5:52 am - Reply

    Guy, may be, it´s not the right post. During your interview with Technation you´ve said:
    “If you are lucky you can hire smart people and if you are smart you can hire lucky people!”
    You hit the nail on the head.

  15. Sean February 25, 2006 at 8:53 pm - Reply

    Thanks for the MP3. I have a long commute – podcasts and MP3s definitely help it to be productive time rather than just drive time.

  16. P February 27, 2006 at 8:41 am - Reply

    Please consider providing a transcript for your podcasts – by not doing so, you discriminate against those who cannot hear. (Unlike those who cannot see, who can have web pages read as synthesised speech, technology is not yet able to transcribe automagically).
    Thanks

  17. Southern Fried Java March 28, 2006 at 8:46 am - Reply

    Pod-less Podcast – “The Art of Raising Capital”

    What about listening to a Podcast on a regular phone? Dial 415-508-3265 to hear Guy Kawasaki reading “The Art of Raising Capital” – the 7th chapter of his excellent book for entrepreneurs, “The Art of the Start” . It’s a good way to gain some knowl

Leave A Comment